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  • Trends and latest findings

    The fuel tax credits net gap estimate for 2017–18 is a small, negative gap of −$5.7 million (−0.1%). As the amount of fuel tax credits underclaimed exceeded the amount of fuel tax credits overclaimed, it has resulted in a negative net gap. This indicates that some taxpayers who are entitled to fuel tax credits have not claimed their full entitlement. This may be either due to conservativism or being unaware of rate increases. This result follows on from the 2016–17 result, where the net gap was −$6.1 million or −0.1%.

    The gap is very small and suggests that most clients are claiming their full entitlements. In general, our strategies to help clients claim the correct amount have been effective in containing the potential leakage of revenue through inappropriate or excessive claiming.

    Note that amounts reported in this estimate are rounded to the nearest $ million.

    Table 1 shows the fuel tax credits claims, compliance, and gross and net fuel tax credits gap estimates for the period 2014–15 to 2017–18.

    Table 1: Fuel tax credits gap, 2014–15 to 2017–18

    Element

    2014–15

    2015–16

    2016–17

    2017–18

    Credit payments ($m)

    6,079

    6,146

    6,328

    6,929

    Gross gap ($m)

    −29

    −53

    −44

    −42

    Amendments ($m)

    −27

    −44

    −38

    −36

    Net gap ($m)

    −2

    −9

    −6

    −6

    Gross gap (%)

    −0.5%

    −0.9%

    −0.7%

    −0.6%

    Net gap (%)

    0.0%

    −0.1%

    −0.1%

    −0.1%

    Note: Changes from previously published estimates are due to modified approaches to extrapolating the REP results and determining liabilities reported but not paid, and revisions to updated ATO data.

    Figure 1 shows the trend in credits claimed and the net gap over the same period.

    Figure 1: Credit payments and fuel tax credits net gap – 2014–15 to 2017–18

    Figure 1: This graph shows the amount of fuel tax credits paid and the net gap stated in Table 1 for the years 2014–15 to 2017–18.

    Figure 2 shows the trend as a percentage.

    Figure 2: Fuel tax credits gross and net gap percentages, 2014–15 to 2017–18

    Figure 2: This graph is a pictorial representation of the gross and net gap percentages stated in Table 1 for the years 2014–15 to 2017–18.

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      Last modified: 17 Oct 2019QC 57176