• 1.a.25 A surgeon, acting as agent for the patient, engages the services of a medical practitioner as a surgical assistant. After the operation has been performed, at the request of the surgical assistant, the surgeon bills the patient and includes both the surgeon's fee and the surgical assistant's fee. When payment is received, the surgeon passes on the surgical assistant’s fee which was included in the invoice to the patient. The surgeon does not charge an administration fee for handling the billing, and so on. Does the transaction between the surgeon and the surgical assistant attract GST?

    For source of ATO view, refer to Part 3 of GSTR 2006/9External LinkGoods and services tax: supplies

    This question focuses on identifying:

    • Whether there is a supply by the surgeon to the patient and a supply by the surgical assistant to the patient (which is merely billed through the surgeon), or
    • Whether there is a supply by the surgical assistant to the surgeon and the surgeon supplies all of the services to the patient.

    In determining the GST treatment of the services provided by the surgical assistant and billed by the surgeon to the patient, it is necessary to identify who is the recipient of the services rendered by the surgical assistant.

    On the facts provided in the question, the recipient of the services provided by the surgical assistant is the patient. The surgeon is merely a conduit through which the patient pays for the surgical assistant’s services. That is, the surgeon merely collects both fees from the patient for administrative convenience. As the payment by the surgeon to the surgical assistant represents consideration for the medical services supplied to the patient, the payment will be GST-free where the requirements of section 38-7 are satisfied.

    It is important to emphasise that each case needs to be considered on its merits. If the facts of a particular supply differ from those stated in this question, the supply may not be GST-free. For example, the surgical assistant will be making a supply to the surgeon rather than the patient where:

    1. the surgeon engages the surgical assistant to provide something to them or to someone else (for example, their patient)
    2. the surgeon, by agreement with the surgical assistant, determines what is required to be provided to them or to the patient
    3. the agreement creates a binding obligation between that surgeon and the surgical assistant for the thing to be provided to them or to the patient.
      Last modified: 16 Oct 2013QC 16330