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  • Wine equalisation tax (WET) records

    If your business is required to account for wine equalisation tax (WET), you need to keep records to show how you calculated your liability or entitlement (if applicable).

    On this page:

    Records required for WET

    WET records information and examples

    Information your records need to show

    Examples of types of records

    You need to keep documentation to show how you calculated your liability or entitlement (if applicable). This may include records of:

    • your sales of wine
    • wine you have applied to your own use
    • buying or selling wine under quote, including periodic quotes
    • sale or distribution contracts and other arrangements
    • bad debts written off
    • import and export transactions.
     
    • Tax invoices
    • Accounting records
    • Production records
    • Sales contracts
    • Quotes in the approved form
    • Import/export documents

    If you're claiming the producer rebate you need to keep records showing that you meet all the eligibility criteria for claiming the rebate including evidence that:

    • your products meet the definition of wine for WET purposes
    • you are the producer of the wine
    • you or the first purchaser were liable to WET for an assessable dealing with the wine
    • you met the source product ownership requirement
    • the packaging and branding requirements were met.

     

    • Product recipes and production records
    • Contract processing agreements
    • Sales records
    • Sales contracts
    • Quotes in the approved form
    • Purchase contracts for source product
    • Weighbridge documents
    • Certificate of trademark registration or evidence of prior use

    How long you need to keep WET records

    You need to keep these records for five years, starting from when you prepared or obtained the records, or completed the transactions or acts those records relate to, whichever is later.

    You should keep records long enough to cover the period of review (also known as the amendment period) for an assessment that uses information from the record.

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    See also:

    Last modified: 04 Dec 2019QC 60740