• Glossary

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    This information may not apply to the current year. Check the content carefully to ensure it is applicable to your circumstances.

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    Adjusted taxable income (ATI)

    The following amounts are included in the calculation of your ATI for determining eligibility for a low income super contribution:

    • your taxable income
    • your reportable employer superannuation contributions
    • your deductible personal superannuation contributions
    • your adjusted fringe benefits
    • certain tax-free government pensions or benefits you received
    • your target foreign income
    • your net financial investment loss
    • your net rental property loss

    less

    • any child support payments you provided to another.

    Business deductions

    Business deductions are all deductions which relate to a business that you carry on, your share of a loss from carrying on a business in a partnership, and deductions relating to expenses that you incur in relation to a distribution from a business partnership.

    Business income

    Business income is income you earn from carrying on a business either solely or in partnership. For the purposes of determining eligible income for Government super contributions purposes, distributions of business income from a trust or from a company in which you hold shares are not regarded as your business income.

    Most business income is included in the Business and professional items schedule for individuals 2014 at P8. However, that schedule instructs that some types of income should be included in other items in your tax return. In order to determine eligibility for Government super contributions we need to know your total business income, not just the amounts included at P8. Accordingly, we ask you to calculate these amounts in worksheets 1, 3 and 5.

    Eligible income

    To be eligible for Government super contributions, 10% or more of your total income (without a reduction for allowable business deductions) must be from eligible income, which is income from running a business, eligible employment or a combination of both.

    To get a Government super contribution for 2013–14, you must be an employee or in business during 2013–14. Common examples of eligible income are salary, allowances, lump sum payments, employment termination payments, reportable fringe benefits and reportable employer super contributions.

    Personal services income you show at item P1 of your Business and professional items schedule for individuals 2014 is treated as eligible income if the income is attributed to employment or business. However, if your personal services income does not relate to employment or the carrying on of a business, then it is ineligible income.

    Employment income

    To be eligible for Government super contributions, 10% or more of your total income (without a reduction for allowable business deductions) must be from eligible income. Eligible income is income that is attributable to employment that you carry on in 2013–14.

    For the purposes of working out your employment income for A3, an employee, in addition to its ordinary meaning, also includes a person who:

    • works under a contract that is wholly or principally for their labour
    • is paid as a member of an executive body of a company (for example, a director of the company)
    • is paid to perform or present, or to participate in the performance or presentation of, any music, play, dance, entertainment, sport, display or promotional activity or any similar activity involving the exercise of intellectual, artistic, musical, physical or other personal skills, or provides services in connection with such activities
    • is paid to perform services in, or in connection with, the making of any film, tape or disc or of any television or radio broadcast
    • holds an appointment, office or position under a Commonwealth, state or territory law, or under the Constitution
    • is in the service of the Commonwealth, or a state or territory (including members of the defence forces, or police force)
    • is a member of parliament (Commonwealth, state or territory).

    A person who holds office as a member of a local government council is not necessarily regarded as an employee of the council. They are only regarded as an employee if the local government council has decided that the salary of its members should be subject to pay as you go (PAYG) withholding.

    For the purposes of determining eligibility for Government super contributions, income that is attributable to employment is included as eligible income. This means that eligible income can include amounts that are compensatory (for example, for lost earnings) or Government incentives (for example, paid parental leave), where there is a connection between the employment activities and the payment. However, such payments are only eligible income for 2013–14 if the person remains an employee of the relevant employer for at least some part of 2013–14.

    Government super contributions

    Government super contributions include both super co-contributions and low income super contributions.

    Ineligible income

    To be eligible for Government super contributions, 10% or more of your total income (without a reduction for allowable business deductions) must be from eligible income, which is income from running a business, eligible employment or a combination of both. For the purposes of filling out A3, income is either eligible or ineligible. Ineligible income includes income from your investments.

    Joint income

    Joint income is any income you earned in conjunction with another person or entity. This may be interest from a jointly held bank account, dividends from jointly owned shares or rental income from a jointly owned rental property.

    Income you earn jointly with another person is treated as partnership income for income tax purposes. In many cases, a partnership return should be lodged, and individuals should return the partnership income less deductions at item 13 as partnership income or a partnership loss. However, if you were not in a partnership carrying on a business, you show your share of the income and expenses at the appropriate item on your own tax return. This would be the case if the only income derived jointly (or in common) with another person was:

    • rent from a jointly owned property
    • interest from a jointly held account
    • dividends from jointly held shares.

    For practical purposes, worksheets 1 and 2 also allow for the identification of joint income or deductions in relation to some other joint investments which you may have shown at other items.

    Joint income group

    You are in a joint income group if you owned income-producing assets with another person or persons. For example, you are in two joint income groups if:

    • your parents and you have a joint bank account, and
    • your spouse and you co-own rental properties.

    Low income super contribution

    This is a government measure to boost super savings. If your ATI does not exceed $37,000 and concessional contributions are made to your super account, you may be able to receive a low income super contribution. The payment will be 15% of the sum of your concessional contributions up to a maximum of $500.

    Concessional contributions include:

    • employer (super guarantee) contributions
    • other family and friends' contributions
    • salary sacrifice contributions
    • personal contribution amounts where you have been allowed a deduction
    • notional taxed contributions for individuals with a defined benefit interest

    but do not include:

    • contributions to constitutionally protected funds.

    For further information on 'concessional' contributions, see Super contributions – too much super can mean extra tax.

    You will be eligible for a low income super contribution if all of the following apply:

    • a concessional contribution is made by you or on your behalf, to a complying super fund or retirement savings account after 1 July 2012 (concessional contribution is as defined in the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997)
    • your adjusted taxable income is $37,000 or less
    • 10% or more of your total income (without a reduction for allowable business deductions) is from employment income, carrying on a business or a combination of both
    • you do not hold an eligible temporary resident visa at any time during the year, unless you are a New Zealand resident or holder of a prescribed visa.

    The Government has announced that it intends to remove the low income super contribution, effective from 1 July 2013.

    • If the law is passed you will not be entitled to a low income super contribution in 2013-14
    • If the law is not passed and you are entitled to a low income super contribution, we will make the payment based on the information you provide in your tax return.

    At the time of printing this change had not become law.

    For information about the progress of this legislation go to ato.gov.au/newlegislation

    Solely earned income

    Income you earned that was not joint income.

    Super co-contribution

    A government measure to boost super savings. If your total income is below $48,516you may be able to receive the government super co-contribution by making eligible personal super contributions to your fund.

    Personal super contributions are amounts you choose to contribute to your super fund from your after-tax income. This is in addition to any employer contributions and does not include contributions made through a salary sacrifice arrangement.

    You will be eligible for the super co-contribution if all of the following apply:

    • you make a personal super contribution by 30 June 2014 into a complying super fund or retirement savings account (RSA) and don't claim a deduction for all of it
    • your total income is lower than $48,516
    • 10% or more of your total income (without a reduction for allowable business deductions) is from employment income, carrying on a business or a combination of both
    • you are less than 71 years old on 30 June 2014
    • you do not hold an eligible temporary resident visa at any time during the year, unless you are a New Zealand resident or holder of a prescribed visa
    • you lodge your 2014 tax return.

    Temporary resident

    You are eligible for super co-contributions and low income super contributions only if you do not hold an eligible temporary resident visa at any time during the year, unless you are a New Zealand resident or holder of a prescribed visa.

    If you are a non-resident, the income attributable to employment outside Australia will not be counted as eligible income.

    Total income

    Total income for the purposes of super co-contribution equals:

    • your assessable income plus
    • your reportable fringe benefits total plus
    • the total of your reportable employer super contributions for the income year less
    • any allowable business deductions.
    Last modified: 22 Jul 2014QC 39824