Wine Equalisation Tax Ruling

WETR 2009/2A2 - Addendum

Wine equalisation tax: operation of the producer rebate for other than New Zealand participants

Addendum

This Addendum is a public ruling for the purposes of the Taxation Administration Act 1953. It amends Wine Equalisation Tax Ruling WETR 2009/2 to:

·
explain amendments made to the producer rebate provisions of the A New Tax System (Wine Equalisation Tax) Act 1999, that came into effect on 10 December 2012,
·
reflect changes to the New Tax System (Goods and Services Tax) Act 1999, A New Tax System (Wine Equalisation Tax) Act 1999, and the Taxation Administration Act 1953 as a result of the Indirect Tax Laws Amendment (Assessment) Act 2012, which introduced a self-assessment regime for indirect taxes. It applies to payments or refunds that relate to tax periods starting on or after 1 July 2012 or if they do not relate to any tax periods, liabilities or entitlements that arose on or after 1 July 2012, and
·
clarify the Commissioner's views on the consequences of an entity claiming a producer rebate to which it is not entitled or which exceeds the maximum entitlement for the financial year.

WETR 2009/2 is amended as follows:

1. Paragraph 4

After Note 1, insert:


Note 2: The Addendum to this Ruling that issued on 19 March 2014 explains our view of the law as it applies:

·
on and from 10 December 2012 to the extent that it relates to amendments made to the producer rebate provisions of the WET Act, that came into effect on 10 December 2012.
·
to payments or refunds that relate to tax periods starting on or after 1 July 2012 or if they do not relate to any tax periods, liabilities or entitlements that arose on or after 1 July 2012 to the extent that it relates to amendments made to the A New Tax System (Goods and Services Tax) Act 1999, WET Act and the TAA as a result of the Indirect Tax Laws Amendment (Assessment) Act 2012, which introduced a self-assessment regime for indirect taxes.
·
both before and after its date of issue to the extent it clarifies the Commissioner's views with respect to what happens if the producer rebate is claimed when it should not be claimed or when it is over-claimed. You can rely upon the Addendum on and from its date of issue for the purposes of section 357-60 of Schedule 1 to the TAA.

2. Paragraph 13

After the paragraph; insert:


13A. From 10 December 2012, where a producer blends or further manufactures wine using wine produced by another producer, the amount of rebate for the blended or further manufactured wine is reduced by the sum of any rebate amounts attributable to the other producer's wine.[9A]

3. Paragraph 65

After the paragraph insert:


Reduction for earlier rebate amounts for wine used in manufacture

65A. As set out in paragraphs 36 and 40 to 45 inclusive of this Ruling, an entity may be a producer of rebatable wine where it acquires wine that has been manufactured by another entity and subjects the wine to a process or processes of manufacture. These include but are not limited to manufacturing finished wine from raw wine or blending wines to create wine that is commercially distinct from its inputs.

65B. From 10 December 2012, where a producer rebate relates to an eligible dealing with wine that was manufactured using other wine produced by another producer, the amount of the rebate is reduced by the sum of any earlier rebates for the wine used in the manufacturing process.

65C. The amount of the producer rebate to which a producer is entitled is reduced by the sum of the amount of earlier producer rebates relating to the wine. Subsection 19-17(2) provides that the amount by which a rebate claim for blended or further manufactured wine will be reduced, depends on whether notification of an earlier rebate amount was provided to the purchaser for the purchased wine and, if so, the amount so notified.

65D. Where wine is acquired prior to 10 December 2012, but is blended or used in further manufacture after that date, the acquired wine is taken to have had no earlier rebate.[34A]

Wine lost during manufacture

65E. If bulk wine, for which there is a producer rebate entitlement for the supplying producer, evaporates or is otherwise lost prior to being used in blending or further manufacture, it follows that the amount that is lost was never used in the manufacture of the wine, as required by subsection 19-17(2). Therefore, the earlier producer rebate for the manufactured wine does not include any producer rebate relating to the lost wine.

65F. However, wine that is lost during the manufacturing process, whether by spillage or any other production loss, is wine that is used to manufacture the wine. Therefore the earlier producer rebate for the manufactured wine includes any producer rebate relating to the lost wine.[34B]

Notification of earlier rebate amount

65G. From 10 December 2012 a supplier of wine may choose to notify the purchaser whether the producer of the wine is entitled to a producer rebate and, if they are, the amount of the rebate entitlement (see paragraph 65S for what happens if the supplier does not provide a notice).

65H. Where a supplier chooses to provide notice of a rebate entitlement to a purchaser, the notice must be given in the approved form.[34C] Notice of an earlier rebate will be given in the approved form where it contains all of the following information:

·
the name and ABN of the wine supplier or, for New Zealand wine suppliers who do not have an ABN, the name and address of the wine supplier and the Company Number (if applicable)
·
the name and ABN of the wine recipient
·
a description of the wine being supplied (including the quantity and the price)
·
sufficient information to identify the relevant tax invoice - for example, the tax invoice number, and
·
the date that the wine was supplied.


65I. It must also include one of the following:

·
notification that the producer of the wine being supplied to the recipient is entitled to a producer rebate for the wine, and the monetary amount of producer rebate that the producer of the wine has claimed or is entitled to claim for the wine, or
·
notification that the producer of the wine that is being supplied to the recipient is not entitled to claim a producer rebate for the wine.[34D]


65J. Notice can be given on any document that contains a definite identification of the wine that is the subject of the notice and which is kept by the recipient, for example:

·
on a tax invoice
·
in an email, or
·
in a letter.


65K. The recipient of the notice of rebate entitlement is not required to provide the notice to the Commissioner unless requested to do so. However, the notice should be retained by the recipient in accordance with the record keeping requirements explained in paragraphs 217 and 218 of WETR 2009/1.

65L. If a person gives a notice of rebate entitlement to a purchaser and the notice is false or misleading in a material particular, because of something in it or something omitted from it, the person giving the notice will have committed an offence under the WET Act.[34E]

65M. The recipient of a notice is not required to verify the bona fides of the entity providing the notification, or any other details provided in the approved form, where the recipient has accepted the notice in good faith. However, where information that is required for the notice to be in the approved form is not included, the notice will not be in the approved form. This means that the notice will not be effective.

65N. If a supplier of wine notifies the purchaser in the approved form of the amount of rebate the producer of the purchased wine is entitled to, the purchaser's producer rebate for any wine they have manufactured using the purchased wine is reduced. The amount of reduction is the amount of the earlier rebate that is attributable to the purchased wine used to manufacture the wine.[34F]

Example 6 - Calculating reduction of rebate where notification is received

65O. Winemaker A makes a wholesale sale under quote of 100 litres of semillon that it has manufactured to Winemaker B for $220 (including GST). Winemaker A's entitlement to a producer rebate is 29% x ($220 - 1/11 x $220) = $58. Winemaker A gives notice to Winemaker B of its entitlement to claim the producer rebate for the wine of $58.

65P. Winemaker B uses the wine purchased from Winemaker A to blend with 100 litres of sauvignon blanc it manufactured to manufacture 200 litres of blended semillon sauvignon blanc. Winemaker B sells 30 litres of the blended wine under quote to a wholesale distributor for $110 (including GST).

65Q. But for section 19-17 of the WET Act, Winemaker B is entitled to a rebate for the blended wine of 29% of the selling price of the wine (excluding GST). However, the amount of Winemaker B's rebate claim for the blended wine must be reduced by the amount of the earlier rebate as follows:

29% * ($110 - 1/11 * $110) - (30/200 * $58)


Therefore, Winemaker B's rebate for the 30 litres is $29 - $8.70 = $20.30.

65R. Where a supplier of wine is not the producer of the wine but has been notified by the producer that there is no earlier rebate entitlement, the supplier may notify the purchaser in the approved form that the producer of the purchased wine is not entitled to a rebate for the wine. Where a purchaser is so notified, the purchaser's rebate claim for wine they have manufactured using the purchased wine will not be reduced.[34G]

65S. Where a producer purchases wine for use in blending or further manufacture and does not receive notification in the approved form of any earlier rebate entitlement, the producer rebate for any wine manufactured using that purchased wine must be reduced by an amount as if the seller has been entitled to a producer rebate for that sale.

65T. The producer rebate for wine that has been manufactured using other wine, in respect of which no notice of previous rebate entitlement was provided, is reduced by 29% of the WET exclusive and GST exclusive purchase price of the wine used in the manufacturing process.[34H]

Example 7 - Calculating reduction of rebate where wine is purchased under quote and no notification is received

65U. Wholesaler A purchases 2,000 litres of grenache from Winemaker A. Wholesaler A makes a wholesale sale of the purchased wine under quote to Winemaker B for $4,400 (including GST). Wholesaler A does not provide notice in the approved form to Winemaker B of Winemaker A's rebate entitlement for the wine.

65V. Winemaker B blends the grenache purchased from Wholesaler A with 1,000 litres of mourvedre it manufactured. Winemaker B then sells 3,000 litres of the blended grenache mourvedre wine under quote to Wholesaler B for $6,600 (including GST) for bottling and sale.

65W. The amount of earlier producer rebate attributable to the wine purchased from Wholesaler A is calculated by multiplying the GST exclusive purchase price of the wine purchased from Wholesaler A by 29% (that is 29% x ($4,400 - 1/11 x $4,400) = $1,160)

65X. Winemaker's B's rebate entitlement for the sale of the grenache mourvedre is:

29% * ($6,600 - 1/11 * $6,600) - $1,160


Therefore, the amount of rebate Winemaker B is entitled to for the sale of the grenache mourvedre blend is $580.

Example 8 - Calculating reduction of rebate where wine is not purchased under quote (WET inclusive) and no notification is received

65Y. Wholesaler A purchases 10,000 litres of chardonnay from Winemaker A. Wholesaler A makes a wholesale sale of the purchased wine to Winemaker B for $25,000 (including WET and GST). Wholesaler A does not provide notice in the approved form to Winemaker B of Winemaker A's rebate entitlement for the wine.[34I]

65Z. Winemaker B blends the chardonnay with 2,000 litres of viognier it manufactured. Winemaker B then sells 4,000 litres of the blended chardonnay viognier wine under quote to Wholelsaler B for $17,600 (including GST).

65AA. The amount of earlier producer rebate attributable to the wine purchased from Wholesaler A is calculated by first determining the WET and GST exclusive purchase price of the wine purchased from Wholesaler A and multiplying it by 29% (earlier rebate amount attributable to all of the purchased wine):

29% * [(25,000/1.1)/1.29] = $5,109.23


What then needs to be determined is how much of this earlier rebate amount is attributable to the blended wine the subject of the rebate claim:

(5,109.23 * 4,000/12,000) = $1,703.07


65AB. Winemaker B's rebate entitlement for the sale of the chardonnay viognier is:

29% * 17,600/1.29) - 1,703.07


Therefore, the amount of rebate Winemaker B is entitled to for the sale of the chardonnay viognier blend is $2,936.93.

Earlier rebate for New Zealand wine

65AC. Where a purchaser buys wine from a producer of wine in New Zealand and the New Zealand producer does not give notice of a rebate entitlement in the approved form, the purchaser must reduce any rebate claim for wine they manufacture using the wine acquired from the New Zealand producer. The claim must be reduced by an amount equal to 29% of the 'approved selling price' of the wine purchased from the New Zealand producer and used to manufacture the wine the subject of the rebate claim. [34J] The approved selling price is the price for which the wine is sold by the New Zealand producer, net of any expenses unrelated to the production of the wine. These expenses include transport, freight and insurance, agent's fees and New Zealand or Australian taxes or duties. (Refer to paragraphs 84 to 92 inclusive of WETR 2006/1 for a more detailed discussion of the approved selling price).

65AD. Where components that make up the approved selling price of wine purchased from a New Zealand producer are not expressed in Australian currency, they are to be converted to Australian currency.[34K] The Commissioner has made a Determination setting out the manner for converting components of the approved selling price to Australian currency.[34L]

65AE. The Commissioner's Determination provides two options for New Zealand producers to convert the approved selling price to Australian currency. However, because of the timing of events, only one of these options will be relevant where an Australian producer must determine the amount of a New Zealand producer's earlier rebate in the following circumstances:

·
wine has been purchased from a New Zealand producer
·
the wine purchased from the New Zealand producer has been used in blending or further manufacture by the purchaser
·
the wine resulting from the process of blending or further manufacturing the wine has been the subject of a dealing in relation to which the purchaser is entitled to claim the rebate, and
·
the New Zealand producer has not yet become entitled to claim the rebate or the New Zealand producer has not provided notice of an earlier rebate.


65AF.In these circumstances, any components of the approved selling price that are not expressed in Australian currency must be converted to Australian currency using the Reserve Bank of Australia rate on the earlier of:

·
the day on which the New Zealand producer received any of the consideration from the purchaser for the supply of wine, or
·
the date the invoice is issued to the purchaser.

4. Paragraph 68

After the paragraph insert:


Timing of notification of earlier rebate amount

68A. There is no time limit within which notice of an earlier rebate must be given to a purchaser of wine. Where a producer has made a rebate claim in a tax period for wine they manufactured using another producer's wine, and reduced the claim to take account of an earlier rebate amount in the absence of a notice, but subsequently a notice of earlier rebate is provided, the additional rebate amount must be accounted for as follows:

·
Where the notice of an earlier rebate is provided before the end of the financial year in which the producer made the reduced rebate claim, any additional rebate entitlement resulting from the notice can be claimed in the activity statement for the tax period in which the notice was provided.[37A]
·
Where the notice of an earlier rebate is provided after the end of the financial year in which the producer made the reduced rebate claim, the last activity statement for the financial year in which the producer made the reduced rebate claim must be amended to reflect any additional rebate amount resulting from the provision of the notice. ( Note the producer of the blended or further manufactured wine can only claim the additional rebate amount within the relevant period of review. This means that the producer of the blended or further manufactured wine must both receive notice of an earlier rebate and amend the relevant activity statement within the period of review.[37B]


What happens if the producer rebate is claimed when it should not be claimed or when it is over-claimed

Not entitled to the producer rebate

68B. If an entity has claimed a rebate to which it is not entitled, in whole or in part, an amendment should be made to the entity's assessed net amount for the tax period in which the rebate was claimed. Circumstances where an entity is not entitled to a rebate include the following:

·
the entity is not a producer of the wine[37C]
·
the entity is not liable to wine tax for a taxable dealing or would not have been liable to wine tax for a taxable dealing even if the purchaser had not quoted[37D]
·
the entity calculated the amount of producer rebate incorrectly[37E]
·
the entity is not entitled because one of the exceptions in section 19-10 applies.[37F]


Example 9 - entity not a producer of wine

68C. Wisdom Company lodged quarterly returns in the 2013/2014 financial year claiming producer rebates totalling $500,000 in the following tax periods: Quarter 1 September 2013 - $100,000; Quarter 2 December 2013 - $125,000; Quarter 3 March 2014 - $175,000; Quarter 4 June 2014, $100,000.

68D. Wisdom Company was not a producer of the wine in any of the tax periods and therefore not entitled to the producer rebate in any of those tax periods.

68E. Therefore Wisdom Company's assessed net amounts for each of Quarters 1, 2, 3, and 4 would be amended to disallow the rebates claimed.

68F. This Ruling does not deal with the imposition of penalties. However it is important to note that in these circumstances the Commissioner will consider whether an administrative penalty is applicable [37G] by reference to each of the relevant tax periods in which an amendment is made. The Commissioner will also determine the general interest charge (GIC) that applies less any remission by reference to those tax periods.

68G. Given the penalty and interest outcomes discussed in paragraph 68F above, it is prudent that an entity ensures that it does not claim rebates to which it is not entitled. If the entity does, it should correct the claim as soon as possible.

5. Paragraph 69

Before the paragraph, insert the heading 'Excess claim - single producer' .

6. Paragraph 69

After the paragraph, insert:


69A. Therefore an entity, who is not an associated producer, can correct an excess claim by attributing the amount payable as wine tax payable to the last tax period of the financial year in which the excess claim was made.[39A]

69B. The wine tax law clearly sets out the maximum entitlement for a single producer39B[39B] and the producer rebate may be claimed in the tax period to which the wine tax on the dealing is attributed.[39C] Therefore, if the Commissioner discovers the excess claim (for example through compliance activity) and the entity has not corrected the claim, then the Commissioner will amend the entity's assessed net amount for each of the tax periods to the extent of the excess claim.[39D]

69C. This Ruling does not deal with the imposition of penalties. However it is important to note that in these circumstances the Commissioner will determine any administrative penalty applicable[39E] less any remission[39F] by reference to each of the relevant tax periods in which an amendment is made. The Commissioner will also determine the GIC that applies less any remission by reference to those tax periods.

69D. Given the penalty and interest outcomes discussed in paragraph 69C above, it is prudent that an entity ensures that it does not exceed its maximum entitlement. If the entity does, it should correct the excess claim as soon as possible.

Example 10 - single producer excess claim

69E. Montes Company lodged quarterly returns in the 2012/2013 financial year claiming the producer rebate in the following tax periods: Quarter 1 September 2012 - $200,000; Quarter 2 December 2012 - $175,000; Quarter 3 March 2013 - $275,000; Quarter 4 June 2013, $50,000.

69F. In August 2013, Montes Company discovers that due to a software error they had over claimed the producer rebate by $200,000 in the 2012/2013 financial year ($700,000 claimed less $500,000 maximum entitlement). They can correct the excess claim by attributing $200,000 as wine tax payable at label 1C of the activity statement in Q4 (that is, the tax period ending June 2013 tax period).

69G. If Montes Company does not correct the excess claim and the Commissioner discovers it through compliance activity, the Commissioner would amend Montes Company's assessed net amounts in Q4 by $50,000 and in Q3 by $150,000.

69H. The Commissioner would determine any administrative penalty and general interest charge less any applicable remission for the Q3 and Q4 tax periods.

7. Paragraph 70

Before the paragraph, insert the heading 'Excess claim - associated producer' .

8. Paragraph 70

After the paragraph, insert:


70A. Therefore, if an entity is an associated producer of one or more other producers for a financial year[41A] and:

·
the rebate claimed by the group for a financial year is more than the maximum amount of producer rebates to which the group is entitled for the financial year, and
·
the entity or any other member of the group has not corrected the excess claim in the last tax period of the financial year in which the excess claim was made,[41B]


then the Commissioner will:

·
amend the entity's net amount to include the wine tax payable in the last tax period of the financial year in which the excess claim was made,[41C]
·
seek to recover the excess claim from the group (if appropriate), as each producer member is jointly and severally liable to pay an amount equal to the excess claim,[41D] by amending those entities' net amounts in accordance with section 19-25 to include the wine tax payable, and
·
ensure each of the entities assessed net amounts are not amended for more than the total amount of rebate they individually claimed during the financial year. [41E][41F]


Example 11 - associated producer excess claim

70B. In Quarter 1, Hill Company claimed a producer rebate of $500,000. In Quarter 3, Flat Company claimed a producer rebate of $300,000. At the end of the financial year (end of Quarter 4), the Commissioner determines that Hill Company is an associated producer of Flat Company.

70C. The maximum rebate Flat Company and Hill Company are entitled to as a group is $500,000. Therefore they are jointly and severally liable to pay the excess claim of $300,000 ($800,000 claimed less $500,000 maximum).

70D. The Commissioner will amend Hill Company's assessed net amount under section 19-25 to include $300,000 wine tax payable in Quarter 4. The Commissioner will also amend Flat Company's assessed net amount under section 19-25 to include $300,000 wine tax payable in Quarter 4. The Commissioner will not collect more than $300,000 (the sum of the excess claim) from the group.

Example 12 - associated producer, producer rebate claimed less than excess claim

70E. In Quarter 1, Charles Company claimed a rebate of $500,000. In Quarter 2, Miranda Company claimed a rebate of $500,000. In Quarter 3, Stanley Company claimed a rebate of $200,000.

70F. After the end of the financial year, the Commissioner determines that Charles Company, Miranda Company and Stanley Company are members of a group of associated producers. The maximum rebate to which they are entitled as a group is $500,000. Charles Company, Miranda Company and Stanley Company are jointly and severally liable to pay the excess claim of $700,000 ($1,200,000 total of rebates claimed less $500,000 maximum entitlement).

70G. The liability of each producer cannot exceed the total amount of producer rebate claimed by that producer for the financial year. Since all three producers claimed a rebate of less than $700,000 each, the Commissioner can only amend Charles Company and Miranda Company's Q4 assessed net amounts to include $500,000 wine tax payable each and Stanley Company's net amount to include $200,000 wine tax payable. The Commissioner will not collect more than $700,000 (the sum of the excess claim) from the group.

70H. This Ruling does not deal with the imposition of penalties. However, it is important to note that in these circumstances the Commissioner will consider whether administrative penalties are applicable.[41G] The Commissioner will also determine any GIC that applies less any remission, by reference to those tax period(s).

9. Paragraphs 71 and 72

Omit the paragraphs; substitute:


71. If an entity has allowed volume rebates or discounts which effectively reduce the price for which wine is sold (see paragraphs 118 to 122 of WETR 2009/1) and the volume rebate or discount has not been factored into the calculation of the producer rebate claimed, they will need to adjust their producer rebate accordingly.

72. Consistent with other claims to which an entity is not entitled,[41H] in these circumstances, an amendment should be made to the entity's assessed net amount for the tax period in which the incorrect amount was claimed.

10. Table of Contents on first page

Insert:

Appendix A Page 28
Appendix B Page 33
Appendix C Page 40

11. Detailed contents list

Omit the list; substitute:

What this Ruling is about 1
Date of effect 4
Background 6
How does the wine tax work? 6
Producer rebates 10
Previous Rulings 14
Ruling and Explanation 15
Rebatable wine 15
Producer of rebatable wine 18
Manufacture of wine 26
     Example 1 - manufacture by combining two or more different wines 41
     Example 2 - manufacture by combining two or more different wines 43
     Example 3 - manufacturing a grape wine product 46
Eligible sales and applications to own use 56
     Example 4 - incur wine tax 57
     Example 5 - would have incurred wine tax 59
Exceptions 61
Amount of producer rebate 64
Reduction for earlier rebate amounts for wine used in manufacture 65A
Wine lost during manufacture 65D
Notification of earlier rebate amount 65G
     Example 6 - Calculating reduction of rebate where notification is received 65O
     Example 7 - Calculating reduction of rebate where wine is purchased under quote and no notification is received 65R
     Example 8 - Calculating reduction of rebate where wine is not purchased under quote (WET inclusive) and no notification is received 65Y
Earlier rebate for New Zealand wine 65AC
Associated producer 66
Claiming the producer rebate 67
Timing of notification of earlier rebate amount 68A
What happens if the producer rebate is claimed when it should not be claimed or when it is over-claimed 68B
Not entitled to the producer rebate 68B
     Example 9 - entity not a producer of wine 68C
What happens if the producer rebate is over claimed 69
Excess claim - single producer 69
     Example 10 - single producer excess claim 69E
Excess claim - associated producer 70
     Example 11 - associated producer excess claim 70B
     Example 12 - associated producer, producer rebate claimed less than excess claim 70E
Impact of volume rebates and discounts 71
Detailed contents list 73

12. Legislative references

Insert:

-
ANTS(WET)A 1999 19-15(1B)
-
ANTS(WET)A 1999 19-17(1)
-
ANTS(WET)A 1999 19-17(2)
-
ANTS(WET)A 1999 19-17(3)
-
ANTS(WET)A 1999 19-17(5)
-
ANTS(WET)A 1999 19-28
-
Indirect Tax Laws Amendment (Assessment) Act 2012
-
TAA 1953 Sch 1 105-55
-
TAA 1953 Sch 1 155-15
-
TAA 1953 Sch 1 155-35
-
Tax Laws Amendment (2012 Measures No. 5) Act 2012 Sch 6 Item 4

13. Other references

Insert:

-
Wine Equalisation Tax New Zealand Producer Rebate Foreign Exchange Conversion Determination 2006

14. Appendix A

After Appendix A, insert 'Appendix B and Appendix C'.


Appendix B

Examples relating to earlier producer rebates

Example A - an example to illustrate factoring in earlier rebate amounts.

Example B - an example to illustrate what happens when the producer who supplies the wine has exhausted their producer rebate limit.

Example C - an example to illustrate how to deal with losses before manufacturing and top ups.[43]

Example D - an example to illustrate how to deal with production losses in the course of manufacturing and top ups.[44]

Example E - an example to illustrate how to deal with production losses in the course of manufacturing.

Example F - an example to illustrate 'unit costing' to take into account earlier rebate amounts: the example uses the cents per litre method.

Example A - an example to illustrate factoring in earlier rebate amounts.

Example B - an example to illustrate what happens when the producer who supplies the wine has exhausted their producer rebate limit.

Example C - an example to illustrate how to deal with losses before manufacturing and top ups.

Example D - an example to illustrate how to deal with production losses in the course of manufacturing and top ups.

Example E - an example to illustrate how to deal with production losses in the course of manufacturing.

Example F - an example to illustrate 'unit costing' to take into account earlier rebate amounts: the example uses the cents per litre method.


Appendix C

Example of an acceptable notification form for the purposes of section 19-17 of the WET Act

Where an Australian or New Zealand producer supplies wine to another entity the producer can choose to notify the other entity of the rebate amount to which the producer is entitled in the following form:

Example of an acceptable notification form for the purposes of section 19-17 of the WET Act

The Addendum applies as follows:

·
on and from 10 December 2012 to the extent it relates to amendments made to the producer rebate provisions of the A New Tax System (Wine Equalisation Tax) Act 1999, that came into effect on 10 December 2012.
·
to payments or refunds that relate to tax periods starting on or after 1 July 2012 or if they do not relate to any tax periods, liabilities or entitlements that arose on or after 1 July 2012 to the extent that it relates to amendments made to the A New Tax System (Goods and Services Tax) Act 1999, A New Tax System (Wine Equalisation Tax) Act 1999, and the Taxation Administration Act 1953 as a result of the Indirect Tax Laws Amendment (Assessment) Act 2012, which introduced a self-assessment regime for indirect taxes.
·
both before and after its date of issue to the extent it clarifies the Commissioner's views with respect to what happens if the producer rebate is claimed when it should not be claimed or when it is over-claimed. The Final Addendum can be relied upon on and from its date of issue for the purposes of section 357-60 of Schedule 1 to the TAA.

Commissioner of Taxation
19 March 2014

© AUSTRALIAN TAXATION OFFICE FOR THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

You are free to copy, adapt, modify, transmit and distribute this material as you wish (but not in any way that suggests the ATO or the Commonwealth endorses you or any of your services or products).

Footnotes

[9A]

Subsection 19-17(1).

[34A]

Item 4 of Schedule 6 to the Tax Laws Amendment (2012 Measures No. 5) Act 2012.

[34B]

Refer to Appendix B for further examples relating to earlier producer rebates.

[34C]

Subsection 19-17(3).

[34D]

Refer to Appendix C for an example of an acceptable notification form.

[34E]

Section 19-28.

[34F]

Subsection 19-17(2).

[34G]

Subsection 19-17(2).

[34H]

Subsection 19-17(2).

[34I]

Subsection 19 17(3). See paragraphs 65G and 65R of this Ruling. In this case the Wholesaler is the supplier of the other wine and may provide notice of the producer's (Winemaker A) entitlement.

[34J]

Subsection 19-17(5).

[34K]

Subsection 19-15(1B).

[34L]

Wine Equalisation Tax New Zealand Producer Rebate Foreign Exchange Conversion Determination 2006 (Appendix B of WETR 2006/1).

[37A]

Refer to paragraph 67 and footnote 37 of this Ruling. The Commissioner accepts that producer rebates can be claimed progressively throughout the financial year. That is, a producer rebate can be claimed in the activity statement for the tax period to which wine tax is attributed for the dealing to which the rebate claim relates. The same principle applies for rebate amounts to which a producer becomes entitled as a result of being provided with a notice of earlier rebate.

[37B]

Refer to section 155-15 of Schedule 1 to the TAA, which provides that the Commissioner is treated as having made an assessment of a net amount when a GST return (activity statement) is lodged. Under section 155-35 of Schedule 1 to the TAA, amendments to the assessment may be made within the period of review, which starts on the day the notice of assessment is given and ends four years from the day after the notice of assessment was given. In limited circumstances the four years may be extended if the Commissioner has started to examine your affairs in relation an assessment and has not completed that examination within the period of review - see subsections 155-35(3) and 155-35(4) of Schedule 1 of the TAA.

[37C]

subsection 19-5(1)

[37D]

subsection 19-5(1)

[37E]

section 19-5

[37F]

section 19-10

[37G]

section 284-75 of Schedule 1 to the TAA and section 298-20 of Schedule 1 to the TAA

[39A]

subsection 19-25(1)

[39B]

subsection 9-15(2)

[39C]

Refer to paragraph 67 and footnote 37 of this Ruling.

[39D]

The Commissioner will identify the earliest tax period in the financial year in which the producer rebates have been claimed for that financial year where the total claim for the year has exceeded the maximum, and amend that tax period and all subsequent tax periods (where relevant).

[39E]

section 284-75 of Schedule 1 to the TAA

[39F]

section 298-20 of Schedule 1 to the TAA

[41A]

section 19-20

[41B]

subsection 19-25(4) and paragraph 69 of this Ruling

[41C]

subsection 19-25(4) and paragraph 69 of this Ruling

[41D]

subsection 19-25(3)

[41E]

subsection 19-25(3)

[41F]

The Commissioner will ensure the aggregate amount recovered from the group of associated producers does not exceed the excess claim of the group.

[41G]

By reference to the amount payable by each entity under section 19-25 and in accordance with sections 284-75 and 298-20 of Schedule 1 to the TAA.

[41H]

Refer to paragraphs 68A and 68F to 68G of this Ruling

[43]

The 'term top ups' refers to for example the addition of a quantity of wine to a container of wine to prevent oxidation or to cover loss caused by spillage.

[44]

The 'term top ups' refers to for example the addition of a quantity of wine to a container of wine to prevent oxidation or to cover loss caused by spillage.

References

ATO references:
NO 1-4E7YVF3

ISSN: 1832-3197

Copyright notice

© Australian Taxation Office for the Commonwealth of Australia

You are free to copy, adapt, modify, transmit and distribute material on this website as you wish (but not in any way that suggests the ATO or the Commonwealth endorses you or any of your services or products).