• Quarterly GST reporting

    If your GST turnover is less than $20 million and we haven't told you to report GST monthly, you can report and pay GST quarterly.

    If you report and pay quarterly, you use one of three reporting methods:

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    Full reporting method

    If your GST turnover is $10 million or more, you use the full reporting method.

    Under this reporting method you calculate, report and pay your GST amounts quarterly. You provide more detailed information on your business activity statement (BAS) using the full reporting method.

    You can use either the accounts method or the calculation worksheet method to work out your GST amounts for your BAS.

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    What you need to report

    You must report amounts at the following labels on your BAS:

    • G1 Total sales
    • G2 Export sales
    • G3 Other GST-free sales
    • G10 Capital purchases
    • G11 Non-capital purchases
    • 1A GST on sales
    • 1B GST on purchases

    If you have a wine equalisation tax (WET) or luxury car tax (LCT) liability or entitlement, you must also report these amounts each quarter (labels 1C, 1D, 1E and 1F). These labels are shown on your BAS if you have these obligations.

    Simpler BAS reporting method

    If your GST turnover is less than $10 million, you use the Simpler BAS reporting method unless you are on GST instalments.

    Under this reporting method, you report less information on your quarterly BAS, but still calculate and pay your GST amounts quarterly.

    What you need to report

    You must report amounts at the following labels on your BAS:

    • G1 Total sales
    • 1A GST on sales
    • 1B GST on purchases

    If you have WET or LCT obligations, you must also report these amounts each quarter (labels 1C, 1D, 1E or 1F). These labels are shown on your BAS if you have these obligations.

    You do not need to report amounts at the following labels:

    • G2 Export sales
    • G3 Other GST-free sales
    • G10 Capital purchases
    • G11 Non-capital purchases

    GST instalments method (pay GST instalment quarterly and report annually)

    You may elect this reporting method if you meet the eligibility requirements, including where you:

    • carry on a business with an aggregated turnover of less than $10 million, or
    • do not carry on a business (eg not-for-profit organisation) and your GST turnover is $2 million or less.

    If you elect this reporting method, you pay a quarterly GST instalment that we work out (you can vary it), and report your actual GST information annually on an annual GST return.

    If you wish to use the GST Instalments method you need to contact us.

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    What you need to report

    You must report amounts at the following labels on your annual GST return:

    • G1 Total sales
    • 1A GST on sales
    • 1B GST on purchases
    • 1H GST instalment amounts reported in your quarterly instalment notices for the period shown on the annual GST return

    You do not report amounts at these labels:

    • G2 Export sales
    • G3 Other GST-free sales
    • G10 Capital purchases
    • G11 Non-capital purchases

    If you have WET or LCT obligations, you must also report these amounts on your annual GST return (labels 1C, 1D, 1E or 1F). These labels are shown on your annual GST return if you have these obligations.

    You use your annual GST return to account for any difference between your actual GST liability and the total of your GST instalments for the year (or the period shown on your annual GST return). You show the total amount of GST instalments that were payable for the year (or the period shown on your annual GST return) at label 1H of your annual GST return.

    If the total instalments are more than your actual GST liability for the year, you claim a refund from us. If your total instalments are less than your actual GST liability, you must pay the difference to us by the time your annual GST return is due.

    Under the GST instalments method, any refund you may be entitled to is paid after you lodge your annual GST return for the year.

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    Lodgment and payment dates

    The following table provides a summary of the payment and lodgment dates for businesses that report or pay GST quarterly.

    Table 1: For businesses that report or pay GST quarterly

    Quarter

    Payment and lodgment date

    September quarter

    28 October

    December quarter

    28 February

    March quarter

    28 April

    June quarter

    28 July

    If you have chosen to pay by GST instalments, your instalments are also due on the dates shown above.

    If you are a primary producer or a special professional who pays only two GST instalments for the year, your instalments are due on 28 April and 28 July.

    If the due date falls on a weekend or a public holiday, you have until the next business day to report and pay.

    If you pay GST instalments, your annual GST return will be due on the same date your income tax return is due. If you are not required to lodge an income tax return, your annual GST return will be due by 28 February following the financial year the return covers.

    Changing reporting methods

    Your GST turnover directly determines whether you use the Simpler BAS or full reporting method. If your GST turnover increases above or falls below $10 million, your reporting method changes.

    To elect to use the GST instalment method, there are additional eligibility requirements.

    If you want to switch from or to GST instalments, you need to contact us.

    If you contact us by 28 October, your election or revocation will generally take effect from 1 July of that financial year (or by the concessional due date, if you lodge your September quarter activity statement through a registered agent).

    If you contact us after 28 October, your election or revocation will generally take effect from 1 July of the next financial year.

    You may request in writing that your election take effect from the start of an earlier tax period. However, we will only approve your request under exceptional circumstances.

    See also:

    Last modified: 05 Jul 2017QC 16229