• Where the asset is transferred to you

    Attention

    Warning:

    This information may not apply to the current year. Check the content carefully to ensure it is applicable to your circumstances.

    End of attention

    Assets acquired before 20 September 1985

    If a CGT asset, including a share of a jointly owned asset, was transferred to you because of the breakdown of your marriage and it was acquired by the transferor before 20 September 1985, you are also taken to have acquired the asset before that date. Any capital gain or capital loss you make when you later dispose of the asset will be disregarded.

    However, if you make a major capital improvement to that asset after 20 September 1985, you may be subject to CGT when a CGT event happens to that asset (see Other capital improvements to pre-CGT assets).

    Assets acquired on or after 20 September 1985

    The rules are different if the asset was acquired by the transferor on or after 20 September 1985. In this case, if you receive the CGT asset (or a share of a jointly owned asset) and there is a marriage breakdown rollover, you are taken to have acquired the asset (or share of the asset) at the time it was transferred from your spouse (or the company or trustee).

    To calculate your capital gain or capital loss when a later CGT event happens, the first element of your cost base and reduced cost base will be the same as the cost base and reduced cost base of your spouse (or the company or trustee) at the time of the transfer.

    If the transferor's cost base includes an amount of indexation, you may later have to recalculate the first element of your cost base to exclude that amount if you want to apply the CGT discount to your capital gain.

    Transfer costs incurred by your spouse (or the company or trustee) - for example, conveyancing fees and stamp duty - are included in the cost base.

    If you acquired the asset from your spouse (or the company or trustee) before 11.45am (by legal time in the ACT) on 21 September 1999, you may be able to use the indexation method when calculating your capital gain. This can only apply if the total ownership period of you and your spouse (or the company or trustee) is 12 months or more.

    If you acquired the asset after 11.45am (by legal time in the ACT) on 21 September 1999, you cannot use the indexation method when calculating your capital gain but you may be able to use the discount method. You can use the discount method to calculate your capital gain if the combined period of ownership of the asset for you and your spouse is 12 months or more. If the period is less than 12 months, you use the 'other' method.

    Collectables or personal use assets remain collectables or personal use assets when they are transferred from your spouse (or the company or trustee) in the case of a marriage breakdown rollover.

    For information about collectables and personal use assets, see What is a CGT asset?

    As explained earlier, there are several instances where your spouse (or a company or trustee) may create an asset in your favour. The table below explains how to calculate the first element of your cost base and reduced cost base of that asset in each case.

    CGT event

    Cost base and reduced cost base

    Creating contractual or other rights (D1)

    Incidental costs incurred by the transferor that relate to the event

    Granting an option (D2)

    Expenditure incurred by the transferor to grant the option

    Granting a right to income from mining (D3)

    Expenditure incurred by the transferor to grant the right

    Granting a lease (F1)

    Expenditure incurred by the transferor on the grant renewal or extension of the lease

    You are taken to have acquired the asset at the time specified by the CGT event. For example, for CGT event D1, you acquire the asset at the time you enter into the contract or if there is no contract, the time the right is created. For more information, see appendix 1: Summary of CGT events.

    Last modified: 04 Mar 2016QC 27527