• Key super rates and thresholds

    The following rates and thresholds apply to contributions and benefits, employment termination payments, super guarantee and co-contributions.

    Find out about:

    Contributions caps

    Caps apply to contributions made to your super in a financial year. If you contribute more than these caps, you may have to pay extra tax.

    Find out about:

    Concessional contributions cap

    Concessional contributions include:

    • employer contributions (including contributions made under a salary sacrifice arrangement)
    • personal contributions claimed as a tax deduction.

    If you have more than one fund, all concessional contributions made to all of your funds are added together and counted towards the concessional contributions cap.

    Table 1: Concessional contributions caps

    Income year

    Date

    Your age at this date

    Your concessional contribution cap

    Treatment of excess concessional contributions

    2017–18

    All ages

    $25,000

     

    Included as taxable income, taxed at marginal tax rate plus an excess concessional contributions charge

    2016–17

    30 June 2016

    <49

    $30,000

    49+

    $35,000

    2015–16

    30 June 2015

    <49

    $30,000

    49+

    $35,000

    2014–15

    30 June 2014

    <49

    $30,000

    49+

    $35,000

    2013–14

    30 June 2013

    <59

    $25,000

    59+

    $35,000

    2012–13

    All ages

    $25,000

    Taxed at 46.5%

    (15% levied in super fund, additional 31.5% payable)

    2011–12

    30 June 2012

    <50

    $25,000

    +50

    $50,000

    2010–11

    30 June 2011

    <50

    $25,000

    +50

    $50,000

    2009–10

    30 June 2010

    <50

    $25,000

    +50

    $50,000

    2008–09

    30 June 2009

    <50

    $50,000

    +50

    $100,000

    2007–08

    30 June 2008

    <50

    $50,000

    +50

    $100,000

    Unused concessional cap carry forward

    From 1 July 2018 if you have a total superannuation balance of less than $500,000 on 30 June of the previous financial year, you may be entitled to contribute more than the general concessional contributions cap and make additional concessional contributions for any unused amounts.

    The first year you will be entitled to carry forward unused amounts is the 2019–20 financial year. Unused amounts are available for a maximum of five years, and after this period will expire.

    Table 2: Unused concessional cap carry forward

     

    2017–18

    2018–19

    2019–20

    2020–21

    2021–22

    General contributions cap

    $25,000

    $25,000

    $25,000

    $25,000

    $25,000

    Total unused available cap accrued

    Not applicable

    $0

    $22,000

    $44,000

    $69,000

    Maximum cap available

    $25,000

    $25,000

    $47,000

    $25,000

    $94,000

    Superannuation balance 30 June prior year

    Not applicable

    $480,000

    $490,000

    $505,000

    $490,000

    Concessional contributions

    $nil

    $3,000

    $3,000

    nil

    nil

    Unused concessional cap amount accrued in the relevant financial year

    $0

    $22,000

    $22,000

    $25,000

    $25,000

    Note: This table assumes no indexing of general cap.

    General concessional contributions cap

    From 1 July 2017 the general concessional contributions cap is $25,000 and is indexed in line with average weekly ordinary time earnings (AWOTE), in increments of $2,500 (rounded down). From the 2017–18 financial year, the general concessional contributions cap is not calculated based on age.

    Higher concessional contributions cap for the 2013–14 and later financial years

    The concessional contributions cap was temporarily increased to $35,000 for the:

    • 2013–14 financial year if you were aged 59 years or over on 30 June 2013
    • From the 2014–15 to the 2016–17 financial year if you were aged 49 years or over on the last day of the previous financial year.

    Higher concessional contributions cap for the 2012–13 year

    For the 2012–13 financial year, the higher concessional contributions cap was equal to the general concessional contributions cap of $25,000.

    Higher concessional contributions cap for the 2011–12 and earlier financial years

    An increased concessional contributions cap applied until 30 June 2012 for people aged 50 years or over:

    • if you were aged 50 years or over, your annual cap for the 2007–08 and 2008-09 financial years was $100,000
    • if you were aged 50 years or over, your annual cap for the 2009–10, 2010–11 and 2011–12 financial years was $50,000.

    Excess concessional contribution charge

    The excess concessional contributions (ECC) charge is applied to the additional income tax liability arising due to excess concessional contributions included in your income tax return. The intent of the ECC charge is to acknowledge that the tax is collected later than normal income tax. The charge is payable for the year a person makes excess concessional contributions and applies from the 2013–14 income year onwards.

    The ECC charge period is calculated from the start of the income year in which the excess concessional contributions were made and ends the day before the tax is due to be paid under your first income tax assessment for that year.

    The formula for calculating the ECC charge uses a base interest rate for the day plus an uplift factor of 3%. The base interest rate is the monthly average yield of 90-day Bank Accepted Bills published by the Reserve Bank of Australia.

    This compounding interest formula is applied against the base amount (the additional income tax liability) for each day of the ECC charge period.

    The ECC charge rates are updated quarterly and listed in the table below.

    Table 3: Excess concessional contribution charge rates

    Quarter

    Annual rate

    Daily rate

    April - June 2017

    4.78%

    0.013095890410959%

    January - March 2017

    4.76%

    0.013041095890411%

    October – December 2016

    4.76%

    0.013005464480874%

    July – September 2016

    5.01%

    0.013688524590164%

    April – June 2016

    5.28%

    0.014426229508197%

    January – March 2016

    5.22%

    0.014262295081967%

    October – December 2015

    5.14%

    0.014082191780822%

    July – September 2015

    5.15%

    0.014109589041096%

    April – June 2015

    5.36%

    0.014684931506849%

    January – March 2015

    5.75%

    0.015753424657534%

    October – December 2014

    5.63%

    0.015424657534247%

    July – September 2014

    5.69%

    0.015589041095890%

    April – June 2014

    5.63%

    0.015424657534247%

    January – March 2014

    5.59%

    0.015315068493151%

    October – December 2013

    5.60%

    0.015342465753425%

    July – September 2013

    5.82%

    0.015945205479452%

    See also:

    Non-concessional contributions cap

    Non-concessional contributions include personal contributions for which you do not claim an income tax deduction.

    If you have more than one fund, all non-concessional contributions made to all of your funds are added together and counted towards the non-concessional contributions cap.

    Table 4: Non-concessional contributions cap

    Income year

    Amount of cap

    2017–18

    $100,000 *conditions apply

    2016–17

    $180,000

    2015–16

    $180,000

    2014–15

    $180,000

    2013–14

    $150,000

    2012–13

    $150,000

    2011–12

    $150,000

    2010–11

    $150,000

    2009–10

    $150,000

    2008–09

    $150,000

    2007–08

    $150,000

    The non-concessional cap for an income year is a multiple of the concessional contributions cap.

    If you are under 65, you may be able to make non-concessional contributions of up to three times the annual non-concessional contributions cap in a single year. If eligible, when you make contributions greater than the annual cap, you automatically gain access to future year caps. This is known as the ‘bring-forward’ option.

    From 1 July 2017 the bring-forward amount and period is dependent on your total superannuation balance on the day before the financial year contributions that trigger the bring forward.

    Transitional period transitional arrangements apply if you triggered a bring forward in either the 2015–16 or 2016–17 financial years. If you have triggered a bring forward before 1 July 2017 and you have not fully utilised your bring-forward cap before 1 July 2017, your cap will be reassessed on 1 July 2017 to reflect the new annual cap.

    During the transitional periods (highlighted in the following table), contributions made prior to 1 July 2017 will affect your total non-concessional contributions capacity over the following two years.

    During the transitional periods, contributions made prior to 1 July 2017 will affect your total non-concessional contributions capacity over the following two years.

    Associated earnings rate (for excess non-concessional contributions)

    Individuals have the option of electing to release non-concessional superannuation contributions made from 1 July 2013 which are in excess of the non-concessional contributions cap for 2013–14 and future income years.

    An associated earnings amount is calculated to approximate the amount earned from the excess non-concessional contributions while they were held in the superannuation fund. This is included in the individual’s assessable income.

    Table 5: Associated earnings rates

    Income year

    Annual rate

    Associated earnings rate / daily rate

    2016-17

    8.83%

    0.02419178%

    2015–16

    9.20%

    0.02513661%

    2014–15

    9.61%

    0.02632876%

    2013–14

    9.66%

    0.02646575%

    See also:

    Transitional arrangement for the non-concessional contributions cap between 10 May 2006 and 30 June 2007

    Between 10 May 2006 and 30 June 2007 you could contribute up to $1 million of non-concessional contributions to your super fund. This limit was referred to as the transitional non-concessional contributions cap. If you had more than one fund, all non-concessional contributions made to all your funds were added together and counted towards the cap.

    However, the following contributions were excluded from the $1 million transitional non-concessional contributions cap:

    • contributions arising from personal injury payments
    • up to $1 million of contributions derived from the disposal of certain small business assets – these contributions were subject to the capital gains tax (CGT) cap.

    See also:

    CGT cap amount

    Under the CGT cap, you can during your lifetime exclude non-concessional super contributions from the non-concessional contributions cap up to the CGT cap amount. The CGT cap applies to all excluded CGT contributions, whether they were made between 10 May 2006 and 30 June 2007 or after 30 June 2007.

    Table 6: CGT cap amount

    Income year

    Amount of cap

    2017–18

    $1,445,000

    2016–17

    $1,415,000

    2015–16

    $1,395,000

    2014–15

    $1,355,000

    2013–14

    $1,315,000

    2012–13

    $1,255,000

    2011–12

    $1,205,000

    2010–11

    $1,155,000

    2009–10

    $1.1 million

    2008–09

    $1.045 million

    2007–08

    $1 million

    The CGT cap amount is indexed in line with average weekly ordinary time earnings (AWOTE), in increments of $5,000 (rounded down). The new indexed amount is generally available each February.

    See also:

    Division 293 tax

    From 1 July 2012, Division 293 tax will be applied to certain super contributions to reduce the concessional tax treatment of those contributions made for high income individuals.

    High income threshold

    The high income threshold is:

    Income year

    Threshold amount

    2017–18 onwards

    $250,000

    2012–13 to 2016–17

    $300,000

    An individual's income is added to certain super contributions and compared to the high income threshold. Division 293 tax is payable on the excess over the threshold, or on the super contributions, whichever is less. The rate of Division 293 tax is 15%.

    Division 293 tax is not payable on excess concessional contributions that have been taxed under Division 292 (or refunded under section 292–467).

    End of year interest

    Where Division 293 tax relates to defined benefit interests, payment of the tax is deferred until a super benefit is paid from the interest. We must keep a debt account for each defined benefit interest for which there is an amount of Division 293 tax that has been deferred.

    End of year interest is calculated on the amount by which the deferred debt account is in debit at the end of the income year at the average 10 year Treasury bond rate for that income year.

    Table 7: Div 293 tax – end of year interest

    Income year

    Average 10 year Treasury bond rate

    2015–16

    2.6139%

    2014–15

    2.9978%

    2013–14

    N/A *

    * end of year interest was not applied to deferred debt accounts for the 2013–14 income year.

    Note: A temporary 2% levy applies for the 2014–15, 2015–16 and 2016–17 income years to individuals with a taxable income of more than $180,000 per year. The levy is payable at a rate of 2% of each dollar of a taxpayer’s taxable income over $180,000. This will cease to apply from 1 July 2017.

    Payments from super

    There are several requirements for payments made from super.

    Find out about:

    Low rate cap amount

    The application of the low rate threshold for super lump sum payments is capped. The low rate cap amount is reduced by any amount previously applied to the low rate threshold.

    Table 8: Low rate cap amount

    Income year

    Amount of cap

    2017–18

    $200,000

    2016–17

    $195,000

    2015–16

    $195,000

    2014–15

    $185,000

    2013–14

    $180,000

    2012–13

    $175,000

    2011–12

    $165,000

    2010–11

    $160,000

    2009–10

    $150,000

    2008–09

    $145,000

    2007–08

    $140,000

    The low rate cap amount is indexed in line with AWOTE, in increments of $5,000 (rounded down). The new indexed amount is generally available each February.

    Untaxed plan cap amount

    The untaxed plan cap amount:

    • limits the concessional tax treatment of benefits that have not been subject to contributions tax in a super fund
    • applies to each super plan from which a person receives super lump sum member benefits
    • is used to calculate the excess untaxed roll-over amount.
    Table 9: Untaxed plan cap amount

    Income year

    Amount of cap

    2017–18

    $1,445,000

    2016–17

    $1,415,000

    2015–16

    $1,395,000

    2014–15

    $1,355,000

    2013–14

    $1,315,000

    2012–13

    $1,255,000

    2011–12

    $1,205,000

    2010–11

    $1,155,000

    2009–10

    $1.1 million

    2008–09

    $1.045 million

    2007–08

    $1 million

    The untaxed plan cap amount is indexed in line with AWOTE, in increments of $5,000 (rounded down). The new indexed amount is generally available each February.

    Minimum annual payments for super income streams

    Once you start a pension or annuity on or after 1 July 2007, a minimum amount is required to be paid each year. There is no maximum amount other than the balance of your super account, unless it is a transition to retirement pension in which case the maximum amount is 10% of the account balance.

    The minimum payment amounts have been halved for certain pensions and annuities for the 2008–09, 2009–10 and 2010–11 years and reduced by 25% for the 2011–12 and 2012–13 years. The reductions in these years apply only to account-based pensions and annuities (allocated pensions and annuities and market-linked pensions and annuities).

    Table 10: Minimum percentage factor (indicative only) for each age group

    Age

    Minimum % withdrawal for the 2008–09, 2009–10 and 2010–11 income years for certain pensions and annuities

    Minimum % withdrawal for the 2011–12 and 2012–13 income years for certain pensions and annuities

    Minimum % withdrawal (in all other cases)

    Under 65

    2%

    3%

    4%

    65–74

    2.5%

    3.75%

    5%

    75–79

    3%

    4.5%

    6%

    80–84

    3.5%

    5.25%

    7%

    85–89

    4.5%

    6.75%

    9%

    90–94

    5.5%

    8.25%

    11%

    95 or more

    7%

    10.5%

    14%

    Note: these withdrawal factors are indicative only. To determine the precise minimum annual payment (especially for market linked income streams), refer to the pro-rating, rounding and other rules in the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Regulations 1994.

    Preservation age

    Generally, you must reach preservation age before you can access your super. Use the following table to work out your preservation age.

    Table 11: Preservation age

    Date of birth

    Preservation age

    Before 1 July 1960

    55

    1 July 1960 – 30 June 1961

    56

    1 July 1961 – 30 June 1962

    57

    1 July 1962 – 30 June 1963

    58

    1 July 1963 – 30 June 1964

    59

    From 1 July 1964

    60

    Super lump sum tax table

    Table 12: Super lump sum tax table

    Income component derived in the income year

    Age when payment is received

    Amount subject to tax

    Maximum rate of tax (excluding Medicare levy)

    Member benefit – taxable component – taxed element

    Under preservation age

    Whole amount

    20%

    At or above preservation age and under 60 years

    Up to the low rate cap amount

    Nil

    Above the low rate cap amount

    15%

    Aged 60 years or more

    Nil – amount is non-assessable, non-exempt income

    N/A

    Member benefit – taxable component – untaxed element

    Under preservation age

    Up to untaxed plan cap amount

    30%

    Above untaxed plan cap amount

    45%

    At or above preservation age and under 60 years

    Up to the low rate cap amount

    15%

    Above the low rate cap amount and up to the untaxed plan cap amount

    30%

    Above the untaxed plan cap amount

    45%

    Aged 60 years or more

    Up to the untaxed plan cap amount

    15%

    Above the untaxed plan cap amount

    45%

    Death benefit lump sum benefit paid to non-dependants – taxable component – taxed element

    Any

    Whole amount

    15%

    Death benefit lump sum benefit paid to non-dependants – taxable component – untaxed element

    Any

    Whole amount

    30%

    Death benefit lump sum benefit paid to dependants – taxable component – taxed and untaxed elements

    Any

    None

    Nil

    Rollover super benefits – taxable component – taxed element

    Any

    Nil – amount is non-assessable, non-exempt income

    N/A

    Rollover super benefits – taxable component – untaxed element

    Any

    Up to the untaxed plan cap amount is non-assessable, non-exempt income

    N/A

    Above the untaxed plan cap amount

    45%

    Super lump sum benefits less than $200

    Any

    None

    Nil

    Super lump sum benefit (terminally ill recipient)

    Any

    None

    Nil

    Note:

    • A temporary 2% levy applies for the 2014–15, 2015–16 and 2016–17 income years to individuals with a taxable income of more than $180,000 per year. The levy is payable at a rate of 2% of each dollar of a taxpayer’s taxable income over $180,000. This will cease to apply from 1 July 2017.
    • The Medicare levy rate is 2% from 1 July 2014 for the 2014–15 income year and later income years, and is applied in addition to the maximum rate of tax for each income component.
    • The Medicare levy rate is 1.5% up to and including 30 June 2014 and is applied in addition to the maximum rate of tax for each income component.
    • In the 2011–12 income year the flood levy may apply where an individual's taxable income exceeds $50,000. We have published information to help you work out if the flood levy applies to you.

    See also:

    Departing Australia superannuation payment

    This table covers Departing Australia superannuation payment (DASP) tax rates for lump sums and rollovers.

    Rollovers

    If we hold super money for a former temporary resident as temporary resident unclaimed super money, they have the option of rolling the money over to their super fund if they have subsequently returned to Australia as a permanent resident. This is the only time a rollover of DASP is an option. The rollover is still a DASP and will be taxed according to this table.

    Table 13: DASP tax table

    Component of DASP

    Element of DASP

    DASP tax rate

    Can DASP be included in tax return?

    Tax free

    N/A

    Nil

    No

    Taxable

    Taxed element

    38% DASP tax

    Note: this includes the Temporary Budget Repair Levy of 3%.

    Applies to taxed elements whether taken as DASP lump sum or rollover.

    No

    Taxable

    Untaxed element

    47% DASP tax

    Note: this includes the Temporary Budget Repair Levy of 2%.

    Applies to untaxed elements taken as DASP lump sums. Also to roll-over amounts up to the untaxed roll-over plan cap amount.

    Any part of a rollover that exceeds the untaxed roll-over plan cap amount is subject to tax under the Superannuation (Excess Untaxed Roll-over Amounts Tax) Act 2007 (currently 49%) rather than at DASP tax rates.

    No

    DASP for Working Holiday Makers (WHM)

    Untaxed and taxed elements

    65% DASP tax

    No

    The DASP tax rate for WHM applies from 1 July 2017.

    See also:

    Prior to 1 July 2014 when the Temporary Budget Repair Levy came into effect, the DASP tax rates were:

    • tax free component – NIL
    • taxable component taxed element – 35%
    • taxable component untaxed element – 45%.

    Super income stream tax tables

    Element taxed in the fund of a super income stream

    The table below summarises the taxation of a super income stream paid with an element taxed in the fund.

    The tax-free component is not included. This component is non-assessable non- exempt income in all cases.

    Table 14: Element taxed – super income stream tax rates

    Age of recipient

    Income stream

    Age 60 years or more

    Not assessable, not exempt income

    At or above preservation age and under 60 years

    Taxed at marginal tax rates – Tax offset of 15% is available

    Under preservation age

    Taxed at marginal tax rates, with no tax offset – Tax offset of 15% is available if a disability super benefit

    Medicare levy will apply if amounts are assessable.

    Note:

    • A temporary 2% levy applies for the 2014–15, 2015–16 and 2016–17 income years to individuals with a taxable income of more than $180,000 per year. The levy is payable at a rate of 2% of each dollar of a taxpayer’s taxable income over $180,000. This will cease to apply from 1 July 2017.
    • The Medicare levy rate is 2% from 1 July 2014 for the 2014–15 income year and later income years, and is applied in addition to the maximum rate of tax for each income component.
    • The Medicare levy rate is 1.5% up to and including 30 June 2014 and is applied in addition to the maximum rate of tax for each income component.
    • In the 2011–12 income year the flood levy may apply where an individual's taxable income exceeds $50,000. We have published information to help you work out if the flood levy applies to you.

    Element untaxed in the fund of a super income stream

    The table below summarises the taxation of a super member income stream paid with an element untaxed in the fund.

    The tax-free component is not included. This component is not assessable and not exempt income in all cases.

    Table 15: Element untaxed – super income stream tax rates

    Age of recipient

    Income stream

    Aged 60 years or more

    Taxed at marginal rates, with a 10% tax offset

    At or above preservation age and under 60 years

    Taxed at marginal rates, with no tax offset

    Under preservation age

    Taxed at marginal rates, with no tax offset

    Medicare levy will apply if amounts are assessable.

    Note:

    • A temporary 2% levy applies for the 2014–15, 2015–16 and 2016–17 income years to individuals with a taxable income of more than $180,000 per year. The levy is payable at a rate of 2% of each dollar of a taxpayer’s taxable income over $180,000. This will cease to apply from 1 July 2017.
    • The Medicare levy rate is 2% from 1 July 2014 for the 2014–15 income year and later income years, and is applied in addition to the maximum rate of tax for each income component.
    • The Medicare levy rate is 1.5% up to and including 30 June 2014 and is applied in addition to the maximum rate of tax for each income component.
    • In the 2011–12 income year the flood levy may apply where an individual's taxable income exceeds $50,000. We have published information to help you work out if the flood levy applies to you.

    Annuities and life expectancy factors

    The prescribed life tables referred to in section 27H of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936 can be obtained from the Australian Government Actuary websiteExternal Link.

    Employment termination payments

    An employment termination payment (ETP) is a concessionally-taxed payment you receive from your employer when you terminate your employment.

    Find out about:

    See also:

    ETP cap amount

    An employment termination payment (ETP) is a payment made in consequence of the termination of employment. It can include:

    • amounts for unused rostered days off
    • amounts in lieu of notice
    • a gratuity or ‘golden handshake’
    • an employee’s invalidity payment (for permanent disability, other than compensation for personal injury)
    • certain payments after the death of an employee.

    ETPs do not include:

    • a payment for unused annual leave or unused long service leave
    • the tax-free part of a genuine redundancy payment or an early retirement scheme payment.

    The amount up to the ETP cap amount will be taxed at a concessional rate. The amount in excess of the ETP cap amount will be taxed at the top marginal rate.

    Note: A temporary 2% levy applies for the 2014–15, 2015–16 and 2016–17 income years to individuals with a taxable income of more than $180,000 per year. The levy is payable at a rate of 2% of each dollar of a taxpayer’s taxable income over $180,000. This will cease to apply from 1 July 2017.

    ETP cap for life benefit termination payments

    Table 16: Life benefit termination payments ETP cap

    Income year

    Amount of cap

    2017–18

    $200,000

    2016–17

    $195,000

    2015–16

    $195,000

    2014–15

    $185,000

    2013–14

    $180,000

    2012–13

    $175,000

    2011–12

    $165,000

    2010–11

    $160,000

    2009–10

    $150,000

    2008–09

    $145,000

    2007–08

    $140,000

    The ETP cap amount is indexed in line with average weekly ordinary time earnings (AWOTE), in increments of $5,000 (rounded down). The new indexed amount is generally available each February.

    ETP cap for death benefit termination payments

    Table 17: Death benefit termination payments ETP cap

    Income year

    Amount of cap

    2017–18

    $200,000

    2016–17

    $195,000

    2015–16

    $195,000

    2014–15

    $185,000

    2013–14

    $180,000

    2012–13

    $175,000

    2011–12

    $165,000

    2010–11

    $160,000

    2009–10

    $150,000

    2008–09

    $145,000

    2007–08

    $140,000

    The ETP cap amount is indexed in line with average weekly ordinary time earnings (AWOTE), in increments of $5,000 (rounded down). The new indexed amount is generally available each February.

    Transitional ETP cap (up to 30 June 2012)

    Transitional arrangements applied if at 9 May 2006, you were entitled to a payment made on the termination of employment under:

    • a written contract
    • an Australian or foreign law (or an instrument under such a law)
    • a workplace agreement under the Workplace Relations Act 1996.

    Employment termination payments made after 30 June 2007 (other than those made under the transitional arrangements) cannot be contributed to or rolled over into super.

    The taxable component of a transitional termination payment will be taxed at:

    • no more than 15% up to the lower cap amount (only where the recipient has reached preservation age)
    • no more than 30% on the amount which exceeds the lower cap amount but does not exceed the upper cap amount
    • the top marginal rate for amounts in excess of the upper cap amount.
    Table 18: Lower and upper caps for transitional termination payments

    Income year

    Lower cap amount

    Upper cap amount (not indexed)

    2011–12

    $165,000

    $1 million

    2010–11

    $160,000

    $1 million

    2009–10

    $150,000

    $1 million

    2008–09

    $145,000

    $1 million

    2007–08

    $140,000

    $1 million

    The lower cap amount for a transitional termination payment is the same as the ETP cap amount for the year (which is generally available each February). The upper cap amount in relation to a transitional termination payment received in an income year is $1 million. Both the lower cap amount and the $1 million upper cap amount are reduced by all amounts received by the person that have previously used the transitional termination payments concession. The lower cap amount does not apply where the recipient is under preservation age.

    Transitional arrangements for termination payments ceased to apply from 1 July 2012.

    Tax-free part of genuine redundancy and early retirement scheme payments

    This table shows the limit set for genuine redundancy and early retirement scheme payments from 1 July 2007 onwards.

    See also:

    Table 19: Genuine redundancy and early retirement scheme payment limits

    Income year

    Base limit

    For each complete year of service

    2017-18

    $10,155

    $5,078

    2016–17

    $9,936

    $4,969

    2015–16

    $9,780

    $4,891

    2014–15

    $9,514

    $4,758

    2013–14

    $9,246

    $4,624

    2012–13

    $8,806

    $4,404

    2011–12

    $8,435

    $4,218

    2010–11

    $8,126

    $4,064

    2009–10

    $7,732

    $3,867

    2008–09

    $7,350

    $3,676

    2007–08

    $7,020

    $3,511

    The base limit and service amount is indexed in line with average weekly ordinary time earnings (AWOTE) each income year. The new indexed amount is generally available each February.

    Note: A temporary 2% levy applies for the 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17 income years to individuals with a taxable income of more than $180,000 per year. The levy is payable at a rate of 2% of each dollar of a taxpayer’s taxable income over $180,000. This will cease to apply from 1 July 2017.

    Super guarantee

    The super guarantee requires employers to provide sufficient super support for their employees. Employers are obliged to contribute a minimum percentage of each eligible employee’s earnings (ordinary time earnings) to a complying super fund or retirement savings account (RSA).

    Find out about:

    Super guarantee percentage

    Table 20: Super guarantee percentage

    Period

    General super guarantee (%)

    Super guarantee (%) for Norfolk Island (transitional rate)

    (from 1 July 2016)

    1 July 2002 – 30 June 2013

    9

    0

    1 July 2013 – 30 June 2014

    9.25

    0

    1 July 2014 – 30 June 2015

    9.5

    0

    1 July 2015 – 30 June 2016

    9.5

    0

    1 July 2016 – 30 June 2017

    9.5

    1

    1 July 2017 – 30 June 2018

    9.5

    2

    1 July 2018 – 30 June 2019

    9.5

    3

    1 July 2019 – 30 June 2020

    9.5

    4

    1 July 2020 – 30 June 2021

    9.5

    5

    1 July 2021 – 30 June 2022

    10

    6

    1 July 2022 – 30 June 2023

    10.5

    7

    1 July 2023 – 30 June 2024

    11

    8

    1 July 2024 – 30 June 2025

    11.5

    9

    1 July 2025 – 30 June 2026

    12

    10

    1 July 2026 – 30 June 2027

    12

    11

    1 July 2027 – 30 June 2028 and onwards

    12

    12

    Note: If you need percentages for years prior to 2002–03, refer to former sections 20 and 21 of the Superannuation Guarantee (Administration) Act 1992, available from our Legal Database.

    Your contributions for each employee need to be made on at least a quarterly basis.

    Table 21: Contribution quarters

    Quarter

    Period

    1

    1 July – 30 September

    2

    1 October – 31 December

    3

    1 January – 31 March

    4

    1 April – 30 June

    Maximum super contribution base

    The maximum super contribution base is used to determine the maximum limit on any individual employee's earnings base for each quarter of any financial year. You do not have to provide the minimum support for the part of earnings above this limit.

    Table 22: Maximum super contributions base

    Income year

    Income per quarter

    2017–18

    $52,760

    2016–17

    $51,620

    2015–16

    $50,810

    2014–15

    $49,430

    2013–14

    $48,040

    2012–13

    $45,750

    2011–12

    $43,820

    2010–11

    $42,220

    2009–10

    $40,170

    2008–09

    $38,180

    2007–08

    $36,470

    2006–07

    $35,240

    2005–06

    $33,720

    2004–05

    $32,180

    2003–04

    $30,560

    2002–03

    $29,220

    2001–02

    $27,510

    2000–01

    $26,300

    1999–2000

    $25,240

    1998–99

    $24,480

    1997–98

    $23,630

    1996–97

    $22,590

    1995–96

    $21,720

    1994–95

    $20,780

    1993–94

    $20,160

    1992–93

    $20,000

    The maximum super contributions base is indexed in line with AWOTE each income year. The new indexed amount is generally available each February.

    Government contributions

    You may be eligible for the super co-contribution, the low-income super contribution (LISC) for the 2012–13 to the 2016–17 financial year or from 1 July 2017, the low income superannuation tax offset (LISTO) which means the government also adds to your super.

    You don't need to apply for government contributions. If you're eligible and your fund has your tax file number (TFN), we will pay it to your fund account automatically.

    Find out about:

    Super co-contributions

    The super co-contribution is designed to assist eligible individuals to save for their retirement. If you are eligible and make personal super contributions during a financial year, the government will match your contribution with a super co-contribution up to certain limits.

    Co-contribution income thresholds

    Table 23: Co-contribution income thresholds

    Year

    Maximum entitlement

    Lower income threshold

    Higher income threshold

    2017–18

    $500

    $36,813

    $51,813

    2016–17

    $500

    $36,021

    $51,021

    2015–16

    $500

    $35,454

    $50,454

    2014–15

    $500

    $34,488

    $49,488

    2013–14

    $500

    $33,516

    $48,516

    2012–13

    $500

    $31,920

    $46,920

    2011–12

    $1,000

    $31,920

    $61,920

    2010–11

    $1,000

    $31,920

    $61,920

    2009–10

    $1,000

    $31,920

    $61,920

    2008–09

    $1,500

    $30,342

    $60,342

    2007–08

    $1,500

    $28,980

    $58,980

    2006–07

    $1,500

    $28,000

    $58,000

    2005–06

    $1,500

    $28,000

    $58,000

    2004–05

    $1,500

    $28,000

    $58,000

    2003–04

    $1,000

    $27,500

    $40,000

    The lower income threshold is indexed in line with AWOTE each income year. The new indexed amount is generally available each February. However, note that the thresholds were frozen between the 2010–11 and 2012–13 years.

    The following changes were also made for all contributions made from 1 July 2012:

    • the maximum co-contribution entitlement was set at $500
    • the matching rate was set at 50%
    • the higher income threshold was set at $15,000 above the lower income threshold.

    Additional eligibility requirements were added from 1 July 2017 which includes:

    • having a Total Superannuation Balance of less than $1.6m on 30 June of the year before the year the contributions are being made
    • having not exceeded your non-concessional contributions cap in the relevant financial year.

    See also:

    Low income superannuation contribution

    From 1 July 2012, the government provides a low income superannuation contribution (LISC) of up to $500 annually for eligible individuals on adjusted taxable incomes of up to $37,000.

    The amount payable under this measure will be calculated by applying a 15 per cent matching rate to concessional contributions made by, or for individuals on adjusted taxable incomes of up to $37,000, with an annual maximum amount payable of $500 (not indexed). The amount will be paid into a superannuation account of the individual to directly boost their retirement savings.

    Concessional superannuation contributions made from 1 July 2012 will be eligible for the LISC. The first payments were made in the 2013–14 income year.

    See also:

    Note: The payment of LISC has been maintained in respect of concessional contributions made up to and including 30 June 2017. Payment of LISC will cease in respect of concessional contributions made on or after 1 July 2017. While LISC will continue to be payable in respect of concessional contributions made up to and including the 2016–17 income year, determinations of LISC will cease at 30 June 2019.

    Low income superannuation tax offset

    From 1 July 2017, the government will introduce the low income superannuation tax offset (LISTO) to assist low income earners to save for their retirement.

    If you earn an adjusted taxable income up to $37,000 you may be eligible to receive a refund into your superannuation account of the tax paid on your eligible concessional superannuation contributions, up to a cap of $500.

    You don't need to apply for LISTO. If you're eligible and your fund has your tax file number (TFN), we will pay it to your fund account automatically.

    See also:

    Other super rates and thresholds

    These rates and thresholds applied up to 30 June 2007 for super contributions and benefits, employment termination payments, super guarantee and co-contributions.

    Find out about:

    Self-managed super fund supervisory levy

    Self-managed super funds (SMSFs) are required to pay a supervisory levy to us on an annual basis. You need to pay the supervisory levy with your SMSF annual return. The amount payable is stated on the return.

    See also:

    Self-managed super fund limited recourse borrowing arrangements interest rates

    The following interest rates charged under a limited recourse borrowing arrangement (LRBA) would be consistent with the safe harbour terms outlined in Practical Compliance Guidelines (PCG) 2016/5 – Income tax arm’s-length terms for limited recourse borrowing arrangements established by self-managed superannuation funds.

    Table 24: Self-managed super fund LRBA interest rates

    Year

    Real property

    Listed shares or units

    2016–17

    5.65%

    7.65%

    2015–16

    5.75%

    7.75%

    Deduction limits based on age

    Up to the 2006–07 income year, super contributions were deductible for income tax purposes in the year you made them, up to certain amounts called the age based limits. The following limits apply to:

    • employers and their associates claiming deductions for contributions made for the benefit of an employee
    • individuals claiming a deduction for personal super contributions.
    Table 25: Age based limits

    Income year

    Under age 35

    Age 35 to 49

    Age 50 to 70

    2006–07

    $15,260

    $42,385

    $105,113

    2005–06

    $14,603

    $40,560

    $100,587

    2004–05

    $13,934

    $38,702

    $95,980

    2003–04

    $13,233

    $36,754

    $91,149

    2002–03

    $12,651

    $35,138

    $87,141

    2001–02

    $11,912

    $33,086

    $82,053

    2000–01

    $11,388

    $31,631

    $78,445

    1999–2000

    $10,929

    $30,356

    $75,283

    1998–99

    $10,600

    $29,443

    $73,019

    1997–98

    $10,232

    $28,420

    $70,482

    1996–97

    $9,782

    $27,170

    $67,382

    1995–96

    $9,405

    $26,125

    $64,790

    1994–95

    $9,000

    $25,000

    $62,000

    Deductibility could only be considered where the contribution was paid on or before the 28th day of the month following the month in which the relevant person turned 70 years of age. ‘Age’ is the person’s age at the date the last contribution was made for them for the year.

    Contributions paid in any year, after 30 June but before the super guarantee contribution deadline (28 July) for the quarter ending 30 June, cannot be claimed as a deduction until the end of the next financial year. For example, super contributions made on 30 June 2005 can be claimed as a deduction in the 2004–05 year. Contributions made on 28 July 2005 can be claimed as a deduction in the 2005–06 year.

    Allocated pension payments

    Up to 30 June 2007, the rules governing allocated pensions allowed for payments between the minimum and maximum limits. To obtain the limits, the pension account balance was divided by each of the maximum and the minimum pension valuation factors in the schedule matching the recipient's age.

    The table below is an extract from Schedule 1AAB of SISR which sets out the maximum and minimum pension valuation factors for pensions starting from 1 January 2006.

    Table 26: Allocated pension payment limits

    Age of beneficiary

    Maximum pension valuation factor

    Minimum pension valuation factor

    63

    10.3

    18.1

    64

    10.1

    17.7

    65

    9.9

    17.3

    66

    9.6

    16.8

    67

    9.3

    16.4

    68

    9.1

    16.0

    For pensions that commenced before 1 January 2006, different pension valuation factors apply. Transitional rules also applied for the period between 1 January 2006 and 30 June 2006.

    Pension valuation factors

    The tables below set out the maximum and minimum pension valuation factors used to calculate maximum and minimum payment limits for pensions and annuities.

    Note: Transitional rules apply to new pensions that start from 1 January 2006 to 30 June 2006. During this time, funds may apply the new or the previous pension valuation factor rates (but only to new pensions).

    See also:

    Table 27: Pension valuation factors for pensions that started on or after 1 January 2006

    Age of beneficiary

    Maximum pension valuation factor

    Minimum pension valuation factor

    20 or less

    12.0

    29.2

    21

    12.0

    29.0

    22

    12.0

    28.9

    23

    12.0

    28.7

    24

    12.0

    28.6

    25

    12.0

    28.4

    26

    12.0

    28.3

    27

    12.0

    28.1

    28

    12.0

    27.9

    29

    12.0

    27.8

    30

    12.0

    27.6

    31

    12.0

    27.4

    32

    12.0

    27.2

    33

    12.0

    27.0

    34

    12.0

    26.8

    35

    12.0

    26.6

    36

    12.0

    26.4

    37

    12.0

    26.2

    38

    12.0

    26.0

    39

    12.0

    25.8

    40

    12.0

    25.5

    41

    12.0

    25.3

    42

    12.0

    25.0

    43

    12.0

    24.8

    44

    12.0

    24.5

    45

    12.0

    24.2

    46

    12.0

    24.0

    47

    12.0

    23.7

    48

    12.0

    23.4

    49

    12.0

    23.1

    50

    12.0

    22.8

    51

    11.9

    22.5

    52

    11.8

    22.2

    53

    11.8

    21.8

    54

    11.7

    21.5

    55

    11.5

    21.1

    56

    11.4

    20.8

    57

    11.3

    20.4

    58

    11.2

    20.1

    59

    11.0

    19.7

    60

    10.9

    19.3

    61

    10.7

    18.9

    62

    10.5

    18.5

    63

    10.3

    18.1

    64

    10.1

    17.7

    65

    9.9

    17.3

    66

    9.6

    16.8

    67

    9.3

    16.4

    68

    9.1

    16.0

    69

    8.7

    15.5

    70

    8.4

    15.1

    71

    8.0

    14.6

    72

    7.6

    14.2

    73

    7.2

    13.7

    74

    6.7

    13.3

    75

    6.2

    12.8

    76

    5.7

    12.3

    77

    5.1

    11.9

    78

    4.5

    11.4

    79

    3.8

    10.9

    80

    3.1

    10.5

    81

    2.3

    10.0

    82

    1.4

    9.6

    83

    1

    9.1

    84

    1

    8.7

    85

    1

    8.3

    86

    1

    7.9

    87

    1

    7.5

    88

    1

    7.2

    89

    1

    6.9

    90

    1

    6.6

    91

    1

    6.3

    92

    1

    6.0

    93

    1

    5.8

    94

    1

    5.5

    95

    1

    5.3

    96

    1

    5.1

    97

    1

    4.9

    98

    1

    4.7

    99

    1

    4.5

    100 or more

    1

    4.4

    Source: Schedule 1AAB Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Amendment Regulations 1994

    Table 28: Pension valuation factors for pensions that started before 1 January 2006

    Age of beneficiary

    Maximum pension valuation factor

    Minimum pension valuation factor

    20 or less

    10

    28.6

    21

    10

    28.5

    22

    10

    28.3

    23

    10

    28.1

    24

    10

    28.0

    25

    10

    27.8

    26

    10

    27.6

    27

    10

    27.5

    28

    10

    27.3

    29

    10

    27.1

    30

    10

    26.9

    31

    10

    26.7

    32

    10

    26.5

    33

    10

    26.3

    34

    10

    26.0

    35

    10

    25.8

    36

    10

    25.6

    37

    10

    25.3

    38

    10

    25.1

    39

    10

    24.8

    40

    10

    24.6

    41

    10

    24.3

    42

    10

    24.0

    43

    10

    23.7

    44

    10

    23.4

    45

    10

    23.1

    46

    10

    22.8

    47

    10

    22.5

    48

    10

    22.2

    49

    10

    21.9

    50

    9.9

    21.5

    51

    9.9

    21.2

    52

    9.8

    20.9

    53

    9.7

    20.5

    54

    9.7

    20.1

    55

    9.6

    19.8

    56

    9.5

    19.4

    57

    9.4

    19.0

    58

    9.3

    18.6

    59

    9.1

    18.2

    60

    9.0

    17.8

    61

    8.9

    17.4

    62

    8.7

    17.0

    63

    8.5

    16.6

    64

    8.3

    16.2

    65

    8.1

    15.7

    66

    7.9

    15.3

    67

    7.6

    14.9

    68

    7.3

    14.4

    69

    7.0

    14.0

    70

    6.6

    13.5

    71

    6.2

    13.1

    72

    5.8

    12.6

    73

    5.4

    12.2

    74

    4.8

    11.7

    75

    4.3

    11.3

    76

    3.7

    10.8

    77

    3.0

    10.4

    78

    2.2

    10.0

    79

    1.4

    9.5

    80

    1

    9.1

    81

    1

    8.7

    82

    1

    8.3

    83

    1

    7.9

    84

    1

    7.5

    85

    1

    7.1

    86

    1

    6.8

    87

    1

    6.4

    88

    1

    6.1

    89

    1

    5.8

    90

    1

    5.5

    91

    1

    5.3

    92

    1

    5.0

    93

    1

    4.8

    94

    1

    4.6

    95

    1

    4.4

    96

    1

    4.2

    97

    1

    4.0

    98

    1

    3.8

    99

    1

    3.7

    100 or more

    1

    3.5

    Source: Schedule 1A Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Amendment Regulations 1994

    See also:

    Low rate threshold – post June 1983 components of eligible termination payments

    Up to 30 June 2007, if your benefits include eligible termination payments (ETPs) and you were aged 55 years or over when you received the ETP, then the cash amount of the post June 1983 component is taxed at lower rates until you reach your low rate threshold (LRT).

    This table contains the LRT limits. The LRT is a lifetime limit, indexed each financial year.

    Table 29: Low rate threshold – post June 1983 components of ETPs

    Income year

    Threshold

    2006–07

    $135,590

    2005–06

    $129,751

    2004–05

    $123,808

    2003–04

    $117,576

    2002–03

    $112,405

    2001–02

    $105,843

    2000–01

    $101,188

    1999–2000

    $97,109

    1998–99

    $94,189

    1997–98

    $90,916

    1996–97

    $86,917

    1995–96

    $83,574

    1994–95

    $79,975

    1993–94

    $77,796

    1992–93

    $76,949

    1991–92

    $73,776

    1990–91

    $68,628

    1989–90

    $64,500

    1988–89

    $60,000

    1987–88

    $55,000

    Tax free part of bona fide redundancy and approved early retirement scheme payments limits

    This table shows the limit set for bona fide redundancy and early retirement payments that applied prior to 1 July 2007. The tax free amount is not an eligible termination payment.

    Table 30: Tax free limits for bona fide redundancy and early retirement scheme payments

    Income year

    Base limit

    Per complete year of service

    2006–07

    $6,783

    $3,392

    2005–06

    $6,491

    $3,246

    2004–05

    $6,194

    $3,097

    2003–04

    $5,882

    $2,941

    2002–03

    $5,623

    $2,812

    2001–02

    $5,295

    $2,648

    2000–01

    $5,062

    $2,531

    1999–2000

    $4,858

    $2,429

    1998–99

    $4,712

    $2,356

    1997–98

    $4,548

    $2,274

    1996–97

    $4,348

    $2,174

    1995–96

    $4,180

    $2,090

    1994–95

    $4,000

    $2,000

    See also:

    Reasonable benefit limits

    Up to 30 June 2007, this table can be used to determine the concessional tax rates limits of a reasonable benefit limit (RBL) for a particular financial year. The table includes both the pension and lump sum RBL.

    Table 31: Reasonable benefit limits

    Income year

    Lump sum

    Pension

    2006–07

    $678,149

    $1,356,291

    2005–06

    $648,946

    $1,297,886

    2004–05

    $619,223

    $1,238,440

    2003–04

    $588,056

    $1,176,106

    2002–03

    $562,195

    $1,124,384

    2001–02

    $529,373

    $1,058,742

    2000–01

    $506,092

    $1,012,181

    1999–2000

    $485,692

    $971,382

    1998–99

    $471,088

    $942,175

    1997–98

    $454,718

    $909,435

    1996–97

    $434,720

    $869,440

    1995–96

    $418,000

    $836,000

    1994–95

    $400,000

    $800,000

    Transitional reasonable benefit limits indexation factors

    The information in the table below gives transitional RBL indexation factors and can be used to index a previous financial year's reasonable benefit limits to the current year in line with inflation.

    Table 32: Indexation factors for transitional reasonable benefit limits

    Income year

    Indexation factor

    2006–07

    1.045

    2005–06

    1.048

    2004–05

    1.053

    2003–04

    1.046

    2002–03

    1.062

    2001–02

    1.046

    2000–01

    1.042

    1999–2000

    1.031

    1998–99

    1.036

    1997–98

    1.046

    1996–97

    1.040

    1995–96

    1.045

    Super contributions surcharge

    Adjusted taxable income

    The surcharge rate varied and was calculated using a person’s adjusted taxable income (ATI). Before 1 July 2003, the maximum surcharge rate was 15%. From 1 July 2003, the maximum surcharge rate was reduced then phased out. The maximum surcharge rate was:

    • 14.5% in 2003–04
    • 12.5% in 2004–05
    • 0% in 2005–06 and beyond.

    No surcharge is payable in respect of super contributions or termination payments made on or after 1 July 2005.

    See also:

    Table 33: For the 2003–04 to 2005–06 financial years

    Income year

    Lower income amount

    Higher income amount

    A (as per formula)

    Indexation factor

    2005–06

    No surcharge is payable for super contributions or termination payments made on or after 1 July 2005

    2004–05

    $99,710

    $121,075

    1709.20000

    1.053

    2003–04

    $94,691

    $114,981

    1399.31034

    1.046

    Table 34: For financial years before 1 July 2003

    Income year

    Lower limit

    Upper limit

    Divisor

    Indexation factor

    2002–03

    $90,527

    $109,924

    $1,295

    1.062

    2001–02

    $85,242

    $103,507

    $1,219

    1.046

    2000–01

    $81,493

    $98,955

    $1,165

    1.042

    1999–2000

    $78,208

    $94,966

    $1,118

    1.031

    1998–99

    $75,856

    $92,111

    $1,084

    1.036

    1997–98

    $73,220

    $88,910

    $1,046

    1.046

    1996–97

    $70,000

    $85,000

    $1,000

    See also:

    10 year Treasury bond rate

    The 10 year Treasury bond rate is used by unfunded defined benefits providers to calculate and debit interest to their members' surcharge debt accounts where applicable. It is also used by us, where applicable, to calculate and debit interest to the surcharge debt accounts of members of constitutionally protected funds.

    Table 35: 10 year Treasury bond rate

    As at

    10 year Treasury bond rate

    30 June 2016

    1.98%

    30 June 2015

    3.01%

    30 June 2014

    3.54%

    30 June 2013

    3.76%

    30 June 2012

    3.04%

    30 June 2011

    5.21%

    30 June 2010

    5.10%

    30 June 2009

    5.52%

    30 June 2008

    6.45%

    30 June 2007

    6.26%

    30 June 2006

    5.79%

    30 June 2005

    5.11%

    30 June 2004

    5.87%

    30 June 2003

    5.01%

    30 June 2002

    5.99%

    30 June 2001

    6.04%

    30 June 2000

    6.16%

    30 June 1999

    6.27%

    30 June 1998

    5.58%

    30 June 1997

    7.05%

    Source: Reserve Bank of Australia, Interest Rates, Capital market yields – Government bonds daily

    The rate is determined as follows:

    • if any Treasury bonds with a 10 year term are issued on 30 June, the rate is the annual yield on those bonds
    • if no Treasury bonds with a 10 year term are issued on 30 June, the rate is the annual yield as published for that day on the Reserve Bank of Australia website as Treasury bonds – Yields – 10 year term.

    Average weekly ordinary time earnings (AWOTE)

    The AWOTE figure for the relevant quarter is used to index some of these thresholds.

    The index number used for a quarter is the original (not the trend or seasonally adjusted) estimate of full-time adult AWOTE for the middle month of the quarter, as first published by the Australian Statistician (refer to ABS catalogue number 6302.0).

    Note: First published AWOTE figures are used for the indexation of thresholds. The ABS revised their historical AWOTE figures from August 1996 to May 2008 to exclude all salary sacrificed amounts. However, this has no impact on super thresholds. For more information on the revised AWOTE figures, refer to the ABS website.

    Table 36: Average weekly ordinary time earnings

    Year

    March quarter

    June quarter

    September quarter

    December quarter

    2016

    n/a

    1516.00

    n/a

    1533.40

    2015

    n/a

     1483.10

    n/a

     1500.50

    2014

    n/a

    1454.10

    n/a

     1477.00

    2013

    n/a

    1420.90

    n/a

     1437.00

    2012

    1348.10

    1349.20

    n/a

    1396.00

    2011

    1291.30

    1304.70

    1324.90

    1330.10

    2010

    1243.90

    1250.10

    1258.80

    1275.20

    2009

    1183.40

    1195.60

    1204.20

    1226.80

    2008

    1124.80

    1131.10

    1151.40

    1165.30

    2007

    1073.80

    1090.00

    1105.10

    1108.50

    2006

    1037.50

    1041.60

    1053.00

    1058.60

    2005

    992.90

    1006.70

    1023.20

    1025.70

    2004

    947.80

    949.50

    962.90

    976.40

    2003

    900.40

    921.00

    929.60

    938.40

    2002

    860.50

    866.80

    879.40

    889.60

    2001

    810.60

    824.10

    838.50

    848.70

    2000

    774.80

    784.20

    796.10

    800.40

    1999

    743.80

    747.30

    753.00

    764.20

    1998

    721.30

    725.20

    735.40

    742.70

    1997

    696.10

    697.60

    704.30

    710.90

    1996

    665.80

    671.20

    674.60

    685.50

    1995

    639.90

    647.20

    653.10

    661.00

    1994

    612.30

    616.90

    620.00

    629.90

    1993

    595.50

    598.00

    600.80

    603.50

    1992

    588.80

    587.30

    585.70

    586.90

    1991

    564.30

    560.20

    567.50

    580.10

    1990

    524.80

    534.50

    541.70

    554.40

    1989

    493.40

    501.40

    509.70

    516.80

    1988

    458.80

    465.60

    470.10

    484.50

    1987

    429.60

    435.60

    446.00

    450.00

    1986

    404.90

    408.30

    419.80

    428.40

    1985

    378.00

    383.10

    388.80

    397.10

    1984

    353.60

    364.90

    369.40

    375.20

    1983

    335.20

    336.50

    339.80

    351.70

    1982

    293.50

    306.00

    317.70

    331.50

    1981

    270.70

    295.10

    304.00

    285.20

    1980

    245.70

    256.70

    268.10

    289.10

    1979

    222.70

    232.80

    238.30

    248.00

    1978

    205.20

    215.50

    218.90

    229.10

    1977

    182.90

    198.70

    203.90

    213.60

    1976

    165.30

    180.70

    184.70

    195.50

    1975

    143.80

    156.40

    157.10

    172.40

    1974

    105.60

    119.90

    129.00

    143.90

    1973

    90.80

    100.80

    103.10

    112.20

    1972

    83.40

    90.60

    90.50

    97.30

    1971

    76.40

    83.70

    84.30

    89.90

    Note: From September 2012, the ABS no longer produces data for March or September.

    ABS data used with permission from the Australian Bureau of StatisticsExternal Link.

    Last modified: 12 May 2017QC 18123